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Seattle Police officer tells protester he’s quitting the department because of Black Lives Matter

A Seattle police officer appeared to announce his resignation from the department because of ongoing Black Lives Matter protests in a viral video, telling an activist ‘I’m leaving, you guys won’.

While the circumstances surrounding the video remain unclear, the officer, who is not named in the clip, is seen pulling up in a patrol vehicle next to a protester, winding down his window and appearing to sarcastically ask, ‘how’s your day going today bud?’

When the activist responds ‘not really, because you’re around,’ the officer tells him he has some good news for him.

‘I’m sorry for that. But just don’t worry man, ’cause guess what?’ he says. ‘I’m leaving. You guys won. F***ing two months baby and I’m out.’

The person filming the exchange asks him to clarify that he’s going to resign, to which the officer responds ‘I’m f***ing gone bro.’

The two men continue to exchange false pleasantries. When asked how he feels about stepping down, the officer says, ‘I’m feeling great. I’m stepping down from this department. You guys won.’

The officer is asked if he is stepping down because of police brutality, to which the officer says he isn’t, rather he’s handing in his badge because he’s tried of dealing with Black Lives Matter protesters.

Their dialogue is momentarily interrupted when the officer becomes embroiled in a heated exchange of words with another protester who is out of frame.

Specifically what sparked the verbal altercation is unclear, but the officer blares his horn and speeds forward in his vehicle, before coming to an abrupt stop and leaning out his door, pointing a finger at that activist who remains off-camera.

While the officer’s attention is diverted elsewhere, the man filming the video calls out to others that ‘this guy is resigning because of Black Lives Matter.’

The officers then returns to his vehicle and speaks to the man filming once more, who proceeds to taunt the officer.

‘You triggered boy? You triggered,’ the man asks the cop. ‘Oink, oink. F*** you and your blue life.’

Amid the man’s taunts, the officer adds one of his own telling the man he can’t wait to finally be friends with him, once he quits Seattle PD.

‘We’ll never be friends,’ the protester angrily insists. ‘We will never see eye-to-eye. I don’t care if you take that badge off, you’ll never be one of my people.’

The nature of how the officer and the activist came to know one another is not addressed in the clip, though a hostility between them is evident.

The Seattle Police Department has not yet returned a DailyMail.com request for comment on the clip.

Unrest has been rife in the city, with protests, vandalism and clashes with police occurring daily in the city ever since the Memorial Day police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

The undated video emerges just days after Seattle’s first black police chief, Carmen Best, announced she’d be stepping down after the city council approved to defund the department and cut 100 cops from the force.

In a statement shared on social media late Monday night, Best wrote that she will officially step down from her post on September 2.

‘This was a difficult decision for me but when it’s time, it’s time,’ Best wrote, adding that she is ‘confident the department will make it through these difficult times’.

You truly are the best police department in the country, and please trust me when I say, the vast majority of people in Seattle support you and appreciate you,’ Best, who served within the department for more than 28 years, said.

‘I am impressed daily at your skill, your compassion and your dedication. I look forward to seeing how this department moves forward through the process of re-envisioning public safety. I relish the work that will be done by all of you,’ she added.

Mayor Jenny Durkan has appointed deputy chief Adrian Diaz to serve as interim police chief.

Earlier on Monday, only one council member, Kshama Sawant, voted against the budget package, saying it does not do enough to defund the police.

Seattle currently has about 1,400 police officers and the reductions fell short of the 50 per cent cut to the department that protesters demanded.

Measures that would cut less than $4million of the department’s $400million annual budget this year passed out of committee unanimously last week.

The City Council also had cut Best’s roughly $285,000 annual salary and the pay of other top police leaders, although the final cuts to Best’s salary were significantly more modest than those approved last week.

The council plan also takes officers off a team that removes homeless camps.

Jason Johnson, the interim director of Seattle’s Human Services Department, said in a letter last week that the move to defund the city’s Navigation Team and redirect money to homeless outreach services will ‘dramatically restrict the city’s ability to address unauthorized encampments’.

‘While we can’t do everything in this summer rebalancing package, we have set the path forward for tremendous work in front of us as a council and as a city,’ Councilwoman Teresa Mosqueda said.

Durkan and Best had urged the council to slow down its discussions about police budgets, saying the issue could be taken up in earnest when the 2021 city budget is considered.

They also said any layoffs would disproportionately target newer officers, often hired from Black and brown communities, and would inevitably lead to lawsuits.

Jason Johnson, the interim director of Seattle’s Human Services Department, said in a letter last week that the move to defund the city’s Navigation Team and redirect money to homeless outreach services will ‘dramatically restrict the city’s ability to address unauthorized encampments’.

‘While we can’t do everything in this summer rebalancing package, we have set the path forward for tremendous work in front of us as a council and as a city,’ Councilwoman Teresa Mosqueda said.

Durkan and Best had urged the council to slow down its discussions about police budgets, saying the issue could be taken up in earnest when the 2021 city budget is considered.

They also said any layoffs would disproportionately target newer officers, often hired from Black and brown communities, and would inevitably lead to lawsuits.

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