Windows 11 makes a contentious modification to the design of a 30-year-old operating system… When they are dissatisfied

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Windows 11 makes a contentious modification to the design of a 30-year-old operating system… When they are dissatisfied

In Windows 11, MICROSOFT has made an unexpected update. And it hasn’t gone over well with everyone.

Windows 11 comes with a slew of new features. The dramatic change includes a revamped Start Menu, dynamic widgets, new options to juggle many windows across several screens, and more. It will be ready for some (but not all) later this year. Beta testers have discovered yet another modification that Microsoft failed to mention during the launch ceremony.

In the all-new desktop operating system, the iconic Blue Screen Of Death, or BSOD, will change from blue to black. Hopefully, this isn’t a change you’ll have to deal with too often. After all, the BSOD appears only when something goes horribly wrong with your computer.

If the last thirty years of Windows upgrades have taught us anything, it’s that you can expect to encounter this error message a few times per year. Some people are displeased with the choice to remove the famous blue color from the terrible error screen, as they are with all modifications.

The Black Screen of Death, or BSOD for short – that’s something, isn’t mentioned in any of the release notes for the Windows 11 test releases that are now available. As a result, it’s probable that Microsoft will return to the famous blue tones before the final release.

I recently discovered that the Blue Screen of Death in Windows 11 has been replaced with a black screen. pic.twitter.com/xnOcOgYBAx

No, the ancient ways must be respected. / In Windows 11, Microsoft’s Blue Screen of Death has been replaced by a dark screen. https://t.co/IJkPqKe380

I’m hoping for a photo of the blue screen of death.

twitter.com/NxqmJVDG7B

And based on some of the online comments in response to the new color, Microsoft might wish to do just that.

“Nooooo… It’s important to keep the ancient ways alive. After gadget blog The Verge first reported on the dramatic color change coming to the error message, one tweeted, “Microsoft’s Blue Screen of Death is changing to black in Windows 11.”

Back in the early 1990s, the infamous Blue Screen of Death originally appeared in Windows 3.0.

It’s remained a fixture in every release since then. With the advent of “Brinkwire Summary News,” the most notable alteration in recent years was the addition of a sad face.

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