The text-messaging fraud at the post office is back! It’s difficult not to be duped by the new message since it’s so persuasive.

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The text-messaging fraud at the post office is back! It’s difficult not to be duped by the new message since it’s so persuasive.

THE infamous Post Office scam has reappeared in the form of a text message that looks so legitimate that it’s easy to be duped into providing personal information.

Scams involving the post office aren’t new, but the current message sent to phones is one of the most complex ever. The latest threat targets iPhone and Android users with a text message that reads, “Post Office: Your cargo has been rerouted to your local branch due to an overdue shipping fee.” After that, there’s a clickable link that uses the post office address to make it look authentic.

Of course, we’ve all received these messages before, but what makes this one so brilliant is that the webpage incorporated in the link leads to something that seems so authentic that it’s easy to be tricked.

To demonstrate how easy it is to be duped, this website went to the website and went through each step of the scam using a false name and address to see exactly what information the criminals are attempting to obtain from unsuspecting Post Office customers.

The entire fraud appears to be very legitimate from the start, with the official Post Office logo displaying, sleek animations emerging, and even the font looking exactly like the actual thing.

The first window you’ll see is a simple message asking for your postcode so that it can check for a missed delivery.

After you’ve provided that information, you’ll be prompted to provide your name and the complete delivery address.

This website then added an entirely made-up name and address, and guess what? A parcel had been found and was waiting to be delivered, according to the system.

And this is where things start to get serious, because the next section of the form begins to ask some extremely sensitive details, such as your date of birth and phone number.

After that information is entered, users are asked to choose a redelivery date, which all appears to be extremely legitimate.

Finally, you’ll see a website requesting £2.39 in order to receive the parcel, as well as a form requesting complete banking information, including a card number, CVV security code, account number, and sort code.

Anyone who falls for this ruse has unintentionally handed over their personal information to a cyber criminal. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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