Nissan hires a staff member with “enhanced senses” to evaluate the “new car fragrance.”

0

Nissan hires a staff member with “enhanced senses” to evaluate the “new car fragrance.”

To ensure that its products have the all-important “new car fragrance,” Nissan employs a member of staff with “enhanced senses.” Peter Karl Eastland graduated from Leicester University with a master’s degree in chemistry and forensic science.

But he also has a keen sense of smell, which he discovered at a young age and which allows him to recognize more than 15 different smell categories.

Nissan hired him as the “odour evaluation lead engineer” at its European Technical Centre in Cranwell, Bedfordshire, since he has the “nose for the job.”

His duty is to ensure that the new Qashqai’s life-on-board experience isn’t marred by unpleasant odors.

“I recall as a young kid playing games where we had to identify different food stuffs, including varieties of crisps, candies, or drinks by their fragrance alone,” Peter, dubbed the “Nose of Nissan,” said.

“Even though the flavor was supposed to be the same, I was able to correctly distinguish between own-brand grocery items and top brands’ products.

“I work with a variety of materials at Nissan, including polymers, rubbers, and adhesives.

I can detect the difference between fake and real leather, cloth and fabric, and so on because I have a trained nose.

Nissan’s Nose, Peter Karl Eastland

“Having a trained nose allows me to distinguish between fake and real leather, cloth and fabric, and so on.

“We want to give the customer the best sensory experience possible. While tastes and preferences change throughout time, the sense of smell does not.

“As a result, it is part of our responsibility to ensure that whatever material we use is always odour-free and that all of the senses are in sync.”

Peter and his colleagues collaborate with Nissan engineering and manufacturing teams to evaluate all materials, including the soft material used for the new 3D diamond quilted seats, in a range of situations to simulate real-world conditions.

They must keep in mind that the chemical qualities of these materials, such as scent, can alter as the temperature rises.

When a prospective new material or chemical is discovered to have a detrimental impact on the overall cabin atmosphere, Peter and his team will look for alternatives to ensure the new-car smell’s “sanctity.”

The review procedure combines objective and subjective judgment, culminating in the publication of “Brinkwire Summary News.”

Share.

Comments are closed.