IMPORTANT WARNING: DO NOT CLICK THE LINK IN THE NEW DPD DELIVERY TEXT SCAM.

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IMPORTANT WARNING: DO NOT CLICK THE LINK IN THE NEW DPD DELIVERY TEXT SCAM.

FRAUDSTERS are looking for new victims by sending out bogus DPD messages claiming a failed cargo delivery and demanding cash.

As we depended more on internet purchasing during the pandemic, text frauds posing as parcel delivery services have grown in popularity over the last year. Three-fifths of Britons have received bogus notifications from Royal Mail, UPS, Hermes, and other delivery companies saying that an item has been lost or stolen.

Consumers have been cautioned of yet another sophisticated text scam going around today. Which? Scammers are sending fake DPD SMS messages to mobile phone numbers, according to reports. These SMS are quite convincing in informing recipients of a supposedly failed delivery attempt. They provide a link to schedule redelivery, but experts advise against clicking it.

When you click on the bogus link, you’ll be taken to a near-exact replica of the DPD website. To assure redelivery, you’ll be required to submit personal information and make a payment. Entering your bank account information could give fraudsters access to your account, which they can easily wipe clean.

Many people are likely to have already been duped by the bogus site, which looks almost identical to the real DPD website. It includes a tracking page with the DPD logo, tagline, and a table with fictitious information about the parcel’s whereabouts. However, the con artists made a few minor errors. The website will prevent you from taking screenshots if some of the dates are not formatted correctly.

“We continue to highlight that only emails sent from one of three DPD email addresses, dpd.co.uk, dpdlocal.co.uk, and dpdgroup.co.uk, are genuine,” DPD said in a statement to Which?

“When it comes to messages, we recommend that customers double-check the URLs inside the notifications to ensure that they are valid. Only include links to www.dpd.co.uk/ or www.dpdlocal.co.uk/. In the last couple of years, we’ve collaborated with Action Fraud and regional police on awareness programs, and we’ll continue to do so.”

Text scams are a widespread form of deception. Scammers send texts to as many phone numbers as they can in the hopes of catching victims off guard. Hundreds of people have been duped, and thousands of pounds have been taken from their accounts.

There are, however, simple measures you can take to safeguard yourself. The National Cyber Security Centre advises taking the following steps:

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