Changes to the Highway Code could lead to “increased conflict” on the roads as non-drivers are prioritized.

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Because non-drivers are given priority, changes to the Highway Code may result in “increased conflict” on the roads.

DRIVERS are being warned about upcoming changes to the Highway Code, which are set to go into effect in a matter of weeks, with some pointing out additional rules that will be required of them.

The new driving laws will take effect on January 29, 2022, with the goal of making roads safer for cyclists, pedestrians, and all other road users.

The new Highway Code rules will attempt to establish a “hierarchy of road users” in order to prioritize those who are most likely to be involved in serious collisions.

Bicyclists, pedestrians, and horseback riders are all included.

The “hierarchy” is outlined in Rule H1, which states: “IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL ROAD USERS ARE AWARE OF THE HIGHWAY CODE, CONSCIOUS OF OTHER ROAD USERS, AND UNDERSTAND THEIR RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE SAFETY OF OTHER ROAD USERS.”

“Those in charge of vehicles that have the greatest potential for causing harm in the event of a collision have the greatest responsibility to exercise caution and reduce the risk they pose to others.”

“Drivers of large goods and passenger vehicles are most affected by this principle, followed by vansminibuses, carstaxis, and motorcycles.

“Cyclists, horseback riders, and horse-drawn vehicles all have a responsibility to keep pedestrians safe.

“Remember that the people you meet may have impaired vision, hearing, or mobility and may be unable to see or hear you.”

Some drivers have criticized the changes, claiming that they will result in more accidents, while others have claimed that they were unaware of the changes.

Many motorists may be unaware of new laws aimed at protecting cyclists and horseback riders, two groups that are frequently overlooked when it comes to traffic laws.

Motorists must slow down to less than 10 mph when driving past horses and riders.

When passing cyclists, drivers must maintain a speed of less than 30 mph.

Other changes include increasing the distance between cyclists and horseback riders when driving around them.

Horses are better protected than cyclists, with a recommended overtaking distance of two meters versus 1.5 meters when passing a cyclist.

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The British Horse Society’s director of safety, Alan Hiscox, praised the new measures.

“I was,” he admitted.

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