After serious injuries and arrests, police provide an urgent update on e-scooter law in the United Kingdom.

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After serious injuries and arrests, police provide an urgent update on e-scooter law in the United Kingdom.

According to a police unit, electric scooters are risky and a “waste” of money.

Last week, Devon and Cornwall Police confiscated an e-scooter from a 15-year-old who was racing around in a risky manner, only days after another adolescent was seriously injured in a scooter incident. In response to the recent events, police officer Kirsty Swift described the scooters as “hazardous.”

It is unlawful to ride one on a road or a pavement, therefore don’t waste your money buying one.

Twitter account of the Charles Cross Police Department

“It’s both unlawful and dangerous – especially when not ridden responsibly, as we’ve clearly seen in the days following the incident on the Barbican,” she continued.

“He [the 15-year-old boy]was riding it on the sidewalk along Southside Street, near pedestrians, including little children and the elderly.

“It’s a very narrow section near the Admiral McBride bar, and there were children in prams and a lot of young people.”

“E-scooter seized by police for multiple offences,” Charles Cross Police Team, which dealt with the careless 15-year-old in Barbican, Plymouth, tweeted. It is unlawful to ride on a road or a pavement, so don’t waste your money buying one.”

The adolescent had been charged with a number of driving offenses, including no insurance and driving without a license, and the case had been referred to the Youth Offending Team because of his age.

Anyone can buy an e-scooter now, but riding one on a UK public road, bike lane, or pavement is unlawful.

Pilot local council-sanctioned year-long trials are currently underway in various cities around the country, including London, however they have recently been criticized.

E-scooters, on the other hand, “aren’t going away,” according to top lawyer Josh Hughes.

“Where someone is hurt by a privately owned e-scooter, such as a pedestrian crossing a road, there is unlikely to be a legitimate insurance policy in place against which the injured party might seek compensation,” he continued.

“This has the potential to leave completely innocent people without justice, which is plainly unacceptable.

It’s worth emphasizing that in this scenario, the rider who caused the injuries would be on the hook for a large sum of money in damages and legal fees.”

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