Novak Djokovic wins a contentious visa appeal, while Emma Raducanu is up against a last-minute opponent.

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Novak Djokovic prevails in a contentious visa appeal, while Emma Raducanu is up against a last-minute opponent.

WEEKLY TENNIS RECAP: With only one week until the Australian Open begins, it’s been a highly dramatic week in the tennis world.

Following his appeal, the world No. 1 was held in a government detention hotel in the city for the weekend before the hearing resumed on Monday, with his parents claiming that their son was treated like a “prisoner.”

But, in a stunning turn of events, the nine-time Australian Open champion won his appeal and had the visa cancellation decision overturned, though he could still have his visa revoked again.

On the court, the start of the season was marked by tournaments in Adelaide and Melbourne, as well as the ATP Cup in Sydney.

Rafael Nadal was among the competitors, competing in his first tournament since winning the Washington ATP 500 five months ago.

Andy Murray, on the other hand, had a disappointing start to the year, losing in the first round of the Melbourne ATP 250, and will now compete in the Sydney International, the US Open’s first event of the season, alongside Emma Raducanu.

More winners emerged from the few tournaments held last week, including more success for stars who have been sidelined by injury and a victory for Canada, led by two young players who grew up together.

Last week’s top stories on and off the court were examined by Express Sport.

For several months, the world No. 1’s participation in the Australia Open had been in doubt, but he announced last Tuesday that he would be flying to Melbourne to compete after receiving “exemption permission,” with Tennis Australia confirming the exemption was medical “following a rigorous review process.”

When asked by border officials and the Victorian government, Djokovic provided “minimal” evidence for his exemption, supported by only one doctor, and was taken to an airport room for overnight questioning. His visa was then cancelled early on Thursday after he provided “minimal” evidence for his exemption, supported by only one doctor, when asked by border officials and the Victorian government.

After his lawyers appealed the decision, the nine-time Australian Open champion was granted permission to stay in a government detention hotel in the city until Monday, when the hearing resumed at 10 a.m. local time.

After a lengthy hearing, the decision was made.

“Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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