Large-scale rule adjustments have been implemented in the Premier League as referees attempt to avoid VAR and penalty errors.

0

Large-scale rule adjustments have been implemented in the Premier League as referees attempt to avoid VAR and penalty errors.

Mike Riley is optimistic that new Premier League rules will return some sanity to the game.

Strikers will no longer be able to “win penalties” by tripping over trailing legs, as referee Mike Riley promises to return the game to its former glory. At the same time, VAR will abandon the pixel-perfect cross-hair lines in favor of the bigger margins utilized at Euro 2020, making narrow “toenail” and “armpit” offside verdicts obsolete.

He is currently on a tour of the country, addressing to teams about the changes to the legislation established by Premier League authorities.

The overall message is that football will return to being a contact sport.

“I think it shifts the dial back to where we were maybe in the pre-VAR world, where officials had a pretty clear knowledge of what the Premier League was about and players knew where refs were coming from,” Riley said.

On the plus side, 19 goals that were previously ruled out due to offside will now be allowed to stand.

If the current Premier League refereeing guidelines for the new season had been in effect this summer, Raheem Sterling’s late penalty against Denmark at the Euros might not have been awarded.

Riley, the head of the Professional Game Match Officials, who has overseen a substantial reworking of the statutes for the upcoming season, simply want for football to feel like football once more.

“Fundamentally, we want to use the strategy that allows the Premier League to flow the best,” he said. “The threshold for referee and assistant intervention, including VAR, will be slightly greater than it was last season.”

A player will no longer be able to purposefully hook his foot on a defender’s leg to induce the referee to point to the spot.

To begin, there must be contact, but only enough to cause the fall. If the referee believes an attacker entered the challenge looking for a penalty, he must now wave play on.

Riley explained, “Both players and defenders want it to be a ‘real’ foul with a consequence, not something where players exploit the tiniest of contacts to go over and we’ve awarded them a penalty to reward it.”

Strikers are promised penalties in exchange for not tumbling so easily. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

Share.

Comments are closed.