TODAY’S SOLAR ECLIPSE: WHEN TO SEE THE SOLAR ECLIPSE IN THE UK ‘These are really rare.’

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TODAY’S SOLAR ECLIPSE: WHEN TO SEE THE SOLAR ECLIPSE IN THE UK ‘These are really rare.’

Today, a SOLAR ECLIPSE will partially wipe out the Sun, providing skygazers with a once-in-a-lifetime experience. When should you keep an eye on the sky for a solar eclipse?

While a few lucky folks in northern Canada and Russia will see an annular “Ring of Fire” eclipse later today, the UK will get a partial eclipse of the Sun. The Moon will pass in front of the star during the astronomical event, obscuring a section of the solar disc. Today, up to a third of the Sun is expected to vanish, according to astronomers.

“On Thursday, June 10, the entire United Kingdom will witness a partial eclipse of the Sun,” according to the Royal Astronomical Society.

“These are really unusual, and this will be a major event.

“The Moon will pass directly in front of the Sun that morning, blotting out up to 38% of its disc.”

Your location will determine how much of the Sun will disappear below the Moon.

However, as a general rule, the more north you live, the more dramatic the eclipse will be.

The actual start and end times of the eclipse will vary depending on your location, but the variances will be minor.

Partial eclipse will begin at 10.08 a.m. BST in London and end at 12.22 p.m. BST.

At approximately 11.13 a.m. BST, the maximum eclipse will occur, resulting in the greatest amount of coverage.

The eclipsing will begin at 10.11 a.m. in Dover and end at 12.22 p.m., with the maximum eclipse occurring at 11.14 a.m. BST.

Here are some sites in the UK where the eclipse will be visible and when it will be viewable:

To find out when the eclipse will begin and end in your region, go to TimeandDate.com.

Although seeing a solar eclipse is a fantastic event, there are certain precautions you should take before going out tomorrow.

Despite the fact that the Sun is partially veiled by the Sun, its harmful rays nevertheless pose a serious threat to your eyes.

As a result, you should never see an eclipse without special eyewear or visors.

“How NOT to watch a solar eclipse: with your eyes!” says the Royal Astronomical Society. A solar eclipse can be dangerous, thus it should only be tried with prudence.

“You should never, ever, ever, ever, ever look directly at the Sun!”

The proper eclipse glasses will have an ISO certification indicating that they are safe to use. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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