The finding of a black hole confirms Einstein was correct! The first time light has been seen from behind a black hole.

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The finding of a black hole confirms Einstein was correct! The first time light has been seen from behind a black hole.

ASTRONOMERS have seen light from behind a black hole for the first time, demonstrating Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity “in action.”

A group of international astronomers lead by experts from Stanford University in the United States made the ground-breaking finding. The astronomers used sophisticated X-ray observatories to pinpoint a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy 800 million light-years away. What looked to be a normal source of X-ray flares quickly showed something utterly unexpected: X-ray light bursts reflected from behind the black hole.

The result, which was published in the journal Nature on July 28th, is consistent with Albert Einstein’s groundbreaking theory of general relativity.

According to popular belief, a black hole’s gravitational pull is so strong that not even light can escape its grasp.

This is precisely why black holes are referred to as “dark”: we can’t see them.

The many events occurring near black holes, like as their burning accretion disks and X-ray fingerprints, can, however, be observed.

“Any light that goes into that black hole doesn’t come out, so we shouldn’t be able to detect anything that’s behind the black hole,” said Dan Wilkins, an astronomer at Stanford’s Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology.

The features of a black hole, however, make it possible to observe what lurks behind it, thanks to theoretical predictions made by Einstein’s ideas in 1915.

“We can observe it because that black hole is warping space, bending light, and twisting magnetic fields around itself,” Dr. Wilkins explained.

The discovery is the first direct sight of light from behind a black hole by scientists, more than a century after Einstein said it would be possible.

According to Einstein, gravity is a distortion of space and time (spacetime) generated by things with mass, rather than a force.

In other words, light traveling through the twisted magnetic fields and spacetime from behind a black hole can appear on the other side.

What better place to investigate spacetime warping than in the vicinity of a black hole, one of the heaviest objects in the universe?

Professor of particle physics and study co-author Roger Blandford remarked, “Fifty years ago,.” Brinkwire Summary News.

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