On the 90th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, a lunar landing scientist unearths a long-lost photo of Neil Armstrong.

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On the 90th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, a lunar landing scientist unearths a long-lost photo of Neil Armstrong.

Professor Farouk El-Baz, a moon landing scientist, has found and shared an astonishing image taken for Neil Armstrong during Apollo 11 with This website.

Armstrong’s 90th birthday would have been today if he hadn’t passed away in 2012. During NASA’s Apollo 11 mission more than 50 years ago, the renowned astronaut became the first man to walk on the Moon. On the lunar surface, Armstrong would give his famous “one little step” speech before spending two and a half hours exploring what would become Tranquility Base with his colleague Buzz Aldrin.

Before burying the US flag in the surface to mark the end of the Space Race, they collected more than 20kg of rock samples.

Thousands of people on Earth would be able to see live TV footage, and NASA would later release troves of photos.

Prof El-Baz, one of the scientists in Mission Control that day, has shared an astonishing photograph that Armstrong shot for him.

Prof. El-Baz spent more than a year collaborating with the Apollo 11 astronauts on a critical assignment that would be critical to the success of future space flights.

The 83-year-old – who was the Apollo program’s lead geologist – revealed how he taught Armstrong to take images of “targets of opportunity” in an exclusive interview with This website.

“Neil was a very pleasant individual with a studious mentality – as if he wanted to learn all the time,” he remarked. He stayed quiet and thoughtful, since he was always ready to learn.

“Most of my briefings were for the entire crew as well as other members of the Manned Spacecraft Center.

“As I described the gloomy grey plain where his group plans to land, he questioned carefully, ‘What don’t you geologists know about that plain?’

“I said right away, the thickness of the lunar soil — that is, the layer that was shattered by impacts.

“I informed him that this could only appear in craters that pierce that layer and hit solid rock, and that there were unlikely to be any such craters near the landing site.”

Prof El-Baz oversaw the landing site selection and had “confirmed that no such craters exist in the selected spot.”

He did, however, explain how the astronauts benefited from a flight mishap. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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