MAPPED SOLAR ECLIPSE: WHERE CAN YOU SEE THE ‘RING OF FIRE’ ECLIPSE NEXT WEEKEND?

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MAPPED SOLAR ECLIPSE: WHERE CAN YOU SEE THE ‘RING OF FIRE’ ECLIPSE NEXT WEEKEND?

On Thursday morning, a SOLAR ECLIPSE will see the Sun vanish behind the Moon, creating a magnificent “Ring of Fire” in the sky. Find out where you can see tomorrow’s annular eclipse.

A spectacular annular eclipse of the Sun is less than 12 hours away for skygazers in certain parts of the planet. The Moon will pass directly in front of the Sun on Thursday morning, nearly obliterating the star. However, unlike a total solar eclipse, which makes the Sun disappear for minutes at a time, the Moon’s edges will be highlighted by a thin ring of the solar disc, known as the “Ring of Fire.”

The Ring of Fire will only be visible from a few locations in the arctic zone, which means it will not be visible from the UK.

However, if you have the proper viewing equipment, you should be able to experience a partial eclipse, which promises to be just as memorable.

Depending on where you are, astronomers estimate that between 20 and 30 percent of the Sun will be obscured during the partial eclipse.

The Ring of Fire, according to Tom Kerss, a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, will be visible mostly over the arctic regions, but the partial eclipse will be visible to a far larger audience.

On his podcast Star Signs: Go Stargazing!, the expert explained: “Partial versions of this eclipse are visible across a considerably greater area, including the northeastern United States, most of Europe, and parts of China, where annularity is not visible but various portions of the Sun appear to be covered.

“So it’s possible that hundreds of millions of people will see it, and I expect tens of millions.”

The eclipse will travel over a tiny stretch of northern Canada, parts of northwest Greenland, and northern Russia, according to NASA.

Nipigon in Canada, Thule Air Base in Greenland, and Srednekolymsk in Russia are some of the greatest spots to watch the eclipse from this short path of annularity.

Here are some of the best spots to witness tomorrow’s annular eclipse:

At 8.12 a.m. UTC tomorrow, the Moon will brush the Sun’s edges for the first time.

By 9.49 a.m. UTC, the first spot to see the total eclipse will have done so.

The annular eclipse is a type of eclipse that occurs just once in a “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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