Following the discovery of dinosaurs, a scientific breakthrough has ‘completely transformed perceptions’ of reptiles.

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Following the discovery of dinosaurs, a scientific breakthrough has ‘completely transformed perceptions’ of reptiles.

Detailed scans of a Tyrannosaurus rex’s jaw “totally transforms our image” of the prehistoric reptile, according to scientists.

The word “dinosaurs” conjures up visions of prehistoric creatures such as the plant-eating Diplodocus, the frightening Tyrannosaurus rex (T rex), and even the agile and smart Velociraptor. When mankind were just a speck in Mother Nature’s eye, these animals roamed the earth. Dinosaurs were initially categorized in the 17th century, and our knowledge of the creatures has grown tenfold since then.

Megalosaurus was the first dinosaur to be officially described, discovered in Kirkdale, Yorkshire, by William Buckland in 1819 – though prehistoric people are likely to have stumbled across innumerable dinosaur remains.

They are thought to have walked and swum throughout the planet’s oceans and lands between 230 and 66 million years ago, during the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous periods.

While it’s tough to imagine what dinosaurs might have looked like in real life, numerous research focusing on diverse skeletal findings have revealed previously unknown facts about the giants.

According to a recent study conducted by Japanese researchers, T rex may have been able to select the most appetizing bits of its recently slaughtered prey to consume.

According to BBC Science Focus magazine, a team of researchers from Fukui Prefectural University’s Institute of Dinosaur Research used computed tomography (CT) scanning techniques to reconstruct the complex structure of blood vessels and nerves discovered in the mandible of a T rex fossil discovered in Montana’s Hell Creek Formation.

They were able to discover that T rex possessed nerve sensors at the tip of its jaw by comparing their data to scans of other dinosaurs such as triceratops, as well as scans of currently living birds and crocodiles.

This allowed the dinosaur to more quickly detect and select the most delicious parts of its victim – a horrifying concept that it knew exactly which part of its prey to snap at.

Dr. Soichiro Kawabe of Fukui Prefectural University’s Institute of Dinosaur Research told the publication: “T rex was a much more dangerous predator than previously thought.

:”Our findings demonstrate that the nerves in Tyrannosaurus rex’s jaw are more complexly distributed than previously thought. “Brinkwire Summary News “..

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