Eclipse of the Sun in 2021: Was there a total solar eclipse today? What did you overlook? ‘It was a surreal moment,’ says the narrator.

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Eclipse of the Sun in 2021: Was there a total solar eclipse today? What did you overlook? ‘It was a surreal moment,’ says the narrator.

On Thursday morning, an astronomical event dubbed the “Ring of Fire” was expected to show in the skies. Was there a total solar eclipse today?

The Ring of Fire eclipse was set to appear in the skies of Canada, Greenland, and Russia’s far north. The moon orb passed in front of the Sun and blotted out all but a blazing ring of the solar disc at eclipse maximum – a so-called annular eclipse – due to the Moon being slightly smaller than usual. But where does that leave the rest of the world? Was the eclipse visible from the United Kingdom today?

With a thick blanket of clouds enveloping the UK today, it was difficult to see if there was anything remarkable in the sky.

Angry skygazers throughout the country took to social media to express their concerns, uploading photos of the bad weather.

“Not seen the Sun since around 10.15am, nothing to do with the Moon eclipsing it alas, it’s pesky clouds eclipsing it,” astronomer and TV host Mark Thompson tweeted. “Much less fascinating.”

“Remember to use protective eyewear when viewing the #SolarEclipse,” another disgruntled skygazer advised.

“You may envision the solar eclipse behind these Manchester clouds if you squint to the point of closing your eyes.”

Yes! Despite the fact that the Ring of Fire, or annular eclipse, was only visible in a few regions of the Earth, partial eclipsing was seen throughout large swaths of the Northern Hemisphere.

Astronomers in the United Kingdom anticipated that the Sun will cover between 20 and 30 percent of the Sun during the greatest eclipse.

The eclipse began a few minutes after 10 a.m. BST, and the maximum eclipse occurred about 11.13 a.m. BST.

Northern Alaska and the northeastern United States, for example, were treated to a more striking panorama.

Around 70% of the Sun was projected to be eclipsed in New York City, for example.

Despite the fact that bad weather hindered the view for many people in the UK, some astronomers were fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of the stars here and there.

“There was a weird moment during today’s #SolarEclipse,” said David Blanchflower, an astrophotographer based in Newcastle.

“I was having my dinner outside while watching the eclipse and photographing it.”

Tom Kerss, a London-based astronomer and member of the Royal Astronomical Society, was also fortunate enough to capture some images and share them. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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