Because ‘we haven’t hit main event yet,’ the Northern Lights will be visible in the UK again tonight.

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Because ‘we haven’t hit main event yet,’ the Northern Lights will be visible in the UK again tonight.

After a solar storm struck Earth in the early hours of this morning, some lucky Britons still have a chance to see the beautiful Northern Lights, as this website can exclusively reveal.

After a solar storm struck Earth in the early hours of this morning, some lucky Britons still have a chance to see the beautiful Northern Lights, as this website can exclusively reveal. At roughly 3:30 a.m. this morning, a G2-level solar storm, commonly known as a coronal mass ejection (CME), collided with the Earth’s magnetic field. Scenes of the Northern Lights were visible in various parts of the world as a result of the solar flare, and the North American continent, in particular, was treated to a spectacular solar light show.

Aurora Alerts UK issued a “red alert” this morning, stating that the Northern Lights may be seen in northern regions of the United Kingdom.

So, if you have yet to witness the Northern Lights dance across the skies of the United Kingdom, all is not lost.

According to Mathew Owens, a professor of space physics at the University of Reading, the next few hours will reveal whether Britons will be able to catch a peak tonight.

While the storm has already hit, we don’t know how things will play out, he said.

“A CME is like a gigantic eruption from the Sun that comes to Earth,” Professor Owens explained to this website.

“It’s a little like a snowplough in that it pushes everything ahead of it.”

“Right now, the Earth is still seated in those snowdrifts ahead of us, and we haven’t even reached the major storm.”

“We’ll know how the storm develops in the next few hours.”

But, according to Professor Owens, it will be during the next few hours that we will know whether or not we can see the Northern Lights, and he told This website that a lucky group up north could be able to get their cameras ready.

“I don’t think we’ll get it down in the south,” he continued, “but northern Scotland might.”

“It depends on what happens in the next several hours.”

“It all comes down to the magnetic field inside the solar flare, and we haven’t figured out which direction it’s pointing yet.”

“We may see the storm pick if it’s pointed southern,” Brinkwire Summary News said.

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