As the economy prepares for a £658 million boost, Britain is experiencing a ‘wine boom.’

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As the economy prepares for a £658 million boost, Britain is experiencing a ‘wine boom.’

BREXIT BRITAIN’S WINE INDUSTRY HAS EXPANDED AS CLIMATE CHANGE HAS CREATED IDEAL WINTER CONDITIONS FOR GRAPE GROWING – and experts predict it might be in line for a £658 million boost.

Temperatures exceeding 14°C have been recorded during the normal growing season, from April to October, making it possible to dependably cultivate more grape varieties and rapidly expand production. British vineyards produced 8.7 million bottles of wine last year. According to the Royal Meteorological Society’s “State of the UK Climate 2020” report, it was the third-warmest year in England since records began in 1884.

Year following year, British wineries are planting more grapevines, and according to WineGB, production in the United Kingdom will reach 40 million bottles per year by 2040.

They also anticipated that wine tourism in the UK could produce £658 million in new revenue by 2040.

“Here in Great Britain, the wine business has been growing fast over the last 10 to 15 years,” said Steve Dorling, director of innovation at the University of East Anglia’s School of Environmental Sciences and a member of WineGB’s research board.

“As a sector, we are bringing many advancements in agriculture, tourism, education, investment, and employment,” said Simon Robinson, Chairman of WineGB.

“This is now a robust, self-assured British industry in which we can rightfully take pride.”

In 2018, the United Kingdom set a new record for wine production, manufacturing 15.6 million bottles, up 130 percent from the previous year.

As the number of vineyards has increased, more British employment have been created as a result of this expansion.

WineGB estimates that between 20,000 and 30,000 new employment in the wine sector might be produced over the next 20 years, with opportunities for vineyard workers and winemakers.

To get a job, you’ll need administrative support and basement door workers.

In recent years, two Champagne houses, Taittinger in Kent and Pommery in Hampshire, have made their debuts.

Mr Dorling did caution, however, that while climate change has helped the UK wine business become tremendously successful, there may still be some production shocks due to the UK’s various weather circumstances.

We should expect warmer and wetter winters, hotter and drier summers, and “more frequent and powerful weather extremes,” according to the Met Office.

Martin Lukac, a University of Michigan professor of ecological science. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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