As a result of Hurricane Ida, Louisiana residents were cautioned of alligators lurking in floodwaters, and a man’s arm was bitten off.

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As a result of Hurricane Ida, Louisiana residents were cautioned of alligators lurking in floodwaters, and a man’s arm was bitten off.

HURRICANE IDA is rushing across Louisiana, destroying homes and leaving millions without power, but an even more terrible threat may be lurking in the shadows: rampaging alligators.

Images of the destructive hurricane obtained by NASA from orbit show the storm as it reached the Gulf Coast when it was still a Category 2 storm. However, Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana on August 29 at 1 p.m. as a Category 4 storm, knocking out electricity to almost one million people. It features 172 mph winds and is the fifth strongest storm to ever hit the US continent.

According to reports, one attack resulted in a man’s arm being bitten off while his wife stood by and called for aid.

However, the man was lost in the floodwaters, and officials are still looking for his body.

While search and rescue crews go door-to-door looking for survivors, the president of Jefferson Parish warned that alligators could be lurking in floods.

“Unfortunately, the worst-case scenario appears to have occurred,” Cynthia Lee Sheng said.

“This is a swampy place with alligators and extremely unsafe situations.

“This morning, [search and rescue workers]had to wait for the Sun to rise. They’d devised a plan.”

Despite the fact that the South is home to an estimated five million alligators, alligator attacks during or after hurricanes are uncommon.

However, during Hurricane Katrina, over 250 alligators at a Mississippi ranch and tour facility escaped their confines.

Hurricane Ida has been compared to Hurricane Katrina, which killed 1,800 people in 2008.

The current hurricane also happened to hit the United States on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Property has also been severely damaged as a result of the storm.

High water has taken over roadways and neighborhoods across Louisiana, causing roofs to blow off buildings, including hospitals, and falling trees to crush automobiles and homes.

“Last year we had (Hurricane) Zeta, and electricity was down for about five days, but it was nothing compared to this — the winds, the gusts, the shingles flying everywhere,” one New Orleans resident told CNN.

The storm is now classified as a tropical storm with a slow movement.

Officials are still concerned that flooding will occur in regions of Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida as a result of the storm.

“Brinkwire Summary News” reports that US President Joe Biden has declared a catastrophic catastrophe.

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