Johnson stands firm on Indyref2, indicating that a fresh vote beyond 2050 will make the “right kind of gap”

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BORIS Johnson has insisted that a second referendum on the future of Scotland should not be held until 2050. He indicated that the “right kind of distance” to hold another referendum on Scottish independence was 40 years or so after the 2014 vote.

The comments of the prime minister came as a major constituency-by-constituency poll conducted over four weeks last month indicated that in the 2024 general election, the SNP is on track for another landslide win, even bigger than the one it won in 2015, when it won 56 of the 59 seats in Scotland.

The Focaldata poll, involving more than 22,000 people, also suggested that in the House of Commons, the Conservatives would lose their majority of 80 seats, while Labour would gain 82 additional constituencies and in three years Westminster would be staring at a’ hung parliament.’

Justin Ibbert, founder of the polling company, believed the statistics indicated that a Labour-SNP coalition government, which would have an overall majority of just over 20 seats, would be the most likely outcome.

Scottish independence: Boris Johnson doubles down on the argument that ‘once in a lifetime’ was the referendum.

However, Sir Keir Starmer is unlikely to accept such a move; a trust and supply deal would be more likely, but the price of Nicola Sturgeon would certainly be Westminster’s facilitation of Indyref2.

Mr. Johnson himself, who will lose his seat in Uxbridge and South Ruislip in north London, where he has a majority of 5,034 votes, and Alister Jack, the Scottish minister whose seat in Dumfries and Galloway will be taken over by the SNP, will be among the possible losers in 2024, wiping out his majority of 1,805 votes.

With opinion polls pointing to a potential nationalist majority in May’s Holyrood elections, Mr. Johnson is likely to come under massive pressure to concede and agree to another referendum on Scottish independence if such a scenario were to occur.

“Referendums in my experience in this country are not particularly fun events, they don’t have a particularly unifying force in the national mood, they should only happen once in a generation; I think that’s what our friends in Scotland [have said].”Referendums are not particularly fun events in my experience in this country, they don’t have a particularly unifying force in the national mood, they should only happen once in a generation; I believe that’s what our friends in Scotland have.

He then noted, “We had a 1975 referendum and until 2016 we didn’t have another one, so that seems like the right kind of distance.” And how about this? ”

A 41-year difference between independence votes will carry Scotland to 2055.

Responding to Mr. Johnson’s remarks, Keith Brown, deputy party leader of the SNP, said, “It may be a new year, but it’s the same old incoherent Boris Johnson bluster.” It’s different, the prime minister pretends, but he knows he can’t keep rejecting democracy.

“Even his American buddy Donald Trump has learned that if you try to stand in the way of a nation’s democratic choice, you will be swept away. The people who will decide our future are the people of Scotland, not Boris Johnson and the Westminster Tories,” he added.

Scottish Greens co-chair Lorna Slater insisted that only the Scottish people had the right to decide the future of Scotland.

Seventeen consecutive opinion polls have shown majorities in favor of independence, with 58% of record support suggesting the latest.

On Scottish independence, the opposition must question the SNP, Tony Blair says.

“Whether it’s the botched handling of the coronavirus crisis, the Brexit disaster or simply the callousness of the Tory governments we didn’t elect, it’s clear the UK is not working for Scotland.”

“The Scottish Greens will go into May’s election with a clear commitment to put Scotland’s future in the hands of Scots, and the people of Scotland will have a say.”With a clear commitment to put Scotland’s future in the hands of the Scots, the Scottish Greens will go into May’s election and the people of Scotland will have a say.

But Pamela Nash, executive director of Scotland in the Union, emphasized, “There is an opportunity for unity after years of division.” And yet the SNP is so concerned with the constitution that it wants Scotland to be split again.

“In the near future, no serious politician can even consider holding a controversial second referendum on independence. By coming to terms with un

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