What time is the Remembrance Day 2021 Two-Minute Silence?

0

What time is the Remembrance Day 2021 Two-Minute Silence?

A two-minute silence will be observed on November 14 to honor soldiers who have died in combat.

Throughout the day, many people will hear the phrase ‘Lest We Forget.’

Here’s the backstory to those famous words, which are frequently used to commemorate the end of World War I in 1918.

“Let us not forget” is a phrase used to remind people not to forget those who fought and died for their country.

“Should not be forgotten,” it literally says.

This is why it is frequently heard during commemorations of Remembrance Day.

It’s commonly found on war memorials and gravestones.

The simple quote encourages people to remember those who have died and the sacrifices they have made.

The phrase, however, was coined more than a decade before World War I ended.

The phrase “lest we forget” is thought to have originated with Rudyard Kipling’s poem Recessional, written for Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897.

“Then beware lest thou forget the Lord who brought thee forth out of the land of Egypt,” says Deuteronomy 6 verse 12 in the Bible.

The poem does not mention fallen soldiers, but it has become a part of Armistice Day traditions.

At the height of the British Empire, Kipling wrote the poem, warning of the dangers of imperialism rather than national sacrifice and recommending faith in God.

The Recessional poem is divided into five stanzas, each with six lines.

On July 17, 1897, The Times published the poem for the first time.

Kipling had no intention of writing a poem for the Jubilee at first, and it went against the celebratory mood of the time, instead serving as a reminder of the fleeting nature of British Imperial power.

Lord God of Hosts, be with us still, lest we forget—lest we forget!

The captains and the kings depart, but Thine ancient sacrifice, an humble and contrite heart, remains. Lord God of Hosts, be with us still, lest we forget—lest we forget!

Our navies are far-called, and the fire is sinking on dune and headland:Lo, all our pomp from yesterdayIs one with Nineveh and Tyre!Judge of the Nations, spare us yet, lest we forget—lest we forget!

If, drunk with power, we looseWild tongues that do not revere Thee,Such boastings as the Gentiles use,Or lesser breeds without the Law—Lord God of Hosts, be with us still, lest we forget—lest we forget!

For her heathen heart…

Brinkwire News in a Nutshell.

Share.

Comments are closed.