Wages are rising as the UK ‘no longer relies on cheap labor from abroad,’ which is a major Brexit benefit.

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Wages are rising as the UK ‘no longer relies on cheap labor from abroad,’ which is a major Brexit benefit.

It is claimed that rising wages in Brexit Britain are due to the fact that the country “no longer relies on cheap labor” from abroad.

Last January 1, the United Kingdom formally exited the European Union.

While there have been some teething problems since the deal, one Brexit supporter sees rising wages as a major benefit.

“Wages are rising in many sectors in the UK because companies operating here can no longer take advantage of an unlimited supply of cheap labor from the European Union,” Robert Kimbell, chairman of the Time Party, tweeted.

“Wages for tradespeople have risen slightly in recent months, and pay at some supermarkets has increased.

“(hashtag)Brexit Advantages.”

Since 2015, the minimum wage in the United Kingdom has increased by a third, to £8.91 an hour.

However, in April, it will rise another 6.6 percent to £9.50, or €11.30, putting it well ahead of France.

Wages are rising in many sectors in the United Kingdom because businesses can no longer rely on an endless supply of cheap labor from the European Union.

Wages for tradespeople have risen slightly, and pay at some supermarkets has increased.

The Advantages of (hashtag)Brexit

In comparison, the minimum wage in France is €10.57.

Mr Kimbell’s remarks come after supermarkets such as Sainsbury’s announced plans to raise pay for 150,000 workers to a minimum of £10 per hour.

Sainsbury’s announced that across the country, all employees would receive a basic hourly pay rate increase from £9.50 to at least £10.

For workers in inner London, the rate will rise to £11.05 from £10.10, and in outer London, the rate will rise to £10.50 from £9.75.

“To begin the New Year, I am pleased that one of the first things we are doing is investing in our colleagues by raising our basic hourly rate of pay to £10,” Sainsbury’s CEO Simon Roberts said.

“We’re making this significant investment to show our colleagues how much we appreciate the outstanding work they do every day for our customers.”

“We’ve also listened to our employees and are improving our employee discount program to help them better plan their grocery spending and manage their shopping budgets, potentially saving hundreds of pounds per year.”

Businesses, on the other hand, have warned that raising the national minimum wage will raise prices.

The increase would “undoubtedly result,” said Kate Nicholls, chief executive of trade group UKHospitality.

“News from the Brinkwire.”

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