Tourists are enthralled by the massive penis statue, but vandals have vandalized the site.

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Tourists are enthralled by the massive penis statue, but vandals have vandalized the site.

Tourists in Peru have been enthralled by a giant penis statue, but the newly erected landmark of a man with an enormous phallus has already been vandalized.

The fibreglass structure is modeled after a ceramic vessel from the pre-Columbian Moche civilisation in Peru.

It has become popular among tourists and locals, with some posing for selfies in the shadow of the 1.5-metre-long member.

One vandal, however, held a security guard at knifepoint and smashed a hole in the nine-foot tall fertility symbol in Peru’s Moche district, about a 15-minute drive from the regional capital Trujillo.

As they fled, shots were fired into the air, according to reports.

“At two a.m., three hooded criminals held a knife to the security guard’s neck to prevent him from reacting or calling his colleagues on the radio, and two of them damaged the phallus,” Moche Mayor Arturo Fernández Bazán told local media.

Mr Fernández Bazán also stated that he plans to erect up to 30 more Mochica culture statues, with about a third of them depicting erotica or childbirth.

The crimson statue can be found along an archaeological trail in the country that just celebrated 200 years of independence from Spain.

Mohica is a prehistoric civilization known for its sexually explicit pottery.

The imposing adobe temples of the sun and moon, or the Huacas del Sol y la Luna, were erected along a route between the roadside statue and the imposing adobe temples of the sun and moon, or the Huacas del Sol y la Luna.

Towards the end of December, it was put on display.

“In our Mochica culture, these types of ceramics vessels were not considered erotic but represented the Godhead,” Mr Fernández Bazán, a gynaecologist before entering local politics, told local media.

“[Ancient] Greeks had a different kind of representation.

We’ve been more assertive and direct in expressing our feelings.”

Some people posted on the Moche municipality’s Facebook page that they found the statue offensive or that it should not be seen by children.

“The idea that children shouldn’t see it or that it’s too offensive belongs to the obscurantism period,” Peruvian culture minister Gisela Ortiz told the Guardian.

“As Peruvians, we should be proud of our diverse heritage, which includes the sexual or erotic side of human nature.”

She is the one in question.

“News from the Brinkwire.”

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