Tonight is the night of the Northern Lights. LIVE — A massive geomagnetic storm solar flare is expected to hit Earth TODAY, prompting aurora borealis warnings.

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Tonight is the night of the Northern Lights. LIVE — A massive geomagnetic storm solar flare is expected to hit Earth TODAY, prompting aurora borealis warnings.

A major solar storm is expected to hit Earth TODAY, and parts of the UK saw the Northern Lights yesterday night.

This is due to a Coronal Mass Ejection, a large explosion of material from the sun that can generate a geomagnetic storm, in which the Earth’s magnetic field is disrupted.

The event might cause power grid variations as well as “orientation inconsistencies” for spacecraft, according to the US Space Weather Prediction Centre. Aurora might be seen as far south as New York, Wisconsin, and Washington.

The UK Met Office has also stated that there is a probability of moderate class flares above its skies, though cloud would likely obscure the view for some.

For the most up-to-date information, see our Northern Lights/Solar Storm live blog…

Scientists have predicted that within the next century, the Earth would be hit by a big solar storm.

According to a 2019 study, the sun is capable of releasing “superflares,” which are volleys of solar energy.

One of the superflares alone may wipe out all of Earth’s electronics, causing billions of dollars in damage and throwing the planet into anarchy.

“Our analysis demonstrates that superflares are unusual phenomena,” said lead scientist Dr Yuta Notsu of the University of Colorado, Boulder.

“However, there is a chance that such an event might occur within the next 100 years or so.”

A superflare may cause havoc around the planet, degrading the ozone layer, exposing airplane passengers to high levels of radiation, and disrupting radio communications.

Experts have even predicted a “low-level extinction event” as a result.

When a solar storm hits, it usually produces a stunning “Northern Lights” display in sections of the atmosphere visible around the Arctic Circle.

As the solar flare approaches Earth, it causes the aurora to move to lower latitudes, allowing the beautiful green colour to be seen from the United Kingdom.

Solar storms produce vivid, colorful dancing lights in white, green, pink, and purple that light up the sky and are a spectacular sight to see.

When different types of gas particles collide with charged particles, color differences arise. Green is the most prevalent aurora color, which is produced when oxygen molecules 60 miles above the ground react with the particles, whereas nitrogen produces a blue or purple hue.

The lights are best seen at the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres, and they are known in the south as the “Aurora Australis” or “southern lights.”

A geomagnetic storm, often known as a geomagnetic storm, is a transient disruption of the Earth’s magnetic field caused by radiation… Brinkwire News in a Nutshell

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