The royal visit to Gibraltar by Prince Edward was dubbed “very unpleasant.”

0

The royal visit to Gibraltar by Prince Edward was dubbed “very unpleasant.”

According to newly discovered papers, when Prince Edward and his wife, Sophie, Countess of Wessex, visited Gibraltar in 2012, they aroused outrage in Spain.

After Brussels requested Spanish boots on the ground as a price for a post-Brexit trade deal, the UK has committed to fight for Gibraltar’s sovereignty. The EU wants Gibraltar to stay in the EU’s single market and Schengen free-travel zone, as well as adopt Madrid’s tax rates. If Spanish police are in “hot pursuit” of a suspect, they will be free to enter the British outpost without being stopped.

According to the EU’s draft mandate, “surveillance would be carried out by Spain at Gibraltar port, airport, and waterways, in accordance with relevant EU standards.”

“Spanish border guards would be given all the tools they need to conduct border checks and surveillance.”

The EU’s negotiator, Commission vice-president Maros Sefcovic, said Madrid “totally intends” to ask the EU’s Frontex border force to assist in the checks.

“It is about regional collaboration, not about sovereignty or jurisdiction,” the top Eurocrat continued.

Mr Raab stated that the EU’s draft mandate was not a negotiation platform and encouraged Brussels to reconsider its ambitions.

Uncovered reports shed light on Madrid’s fury at the Earl and Countess of Wessex in 2012. As tensions rise, with the status of Gibraltar remaining a major point of contention in relations between Britain and Spain, unearthed reports shed light on Madrid’s fury at the Earl and Countess of Wessex in 2012.

Prince Edward and his wife, Sophie Rhys-Jones, visited Gibraltar eight years ago.

While citizens greeted the pair with flags and bunting, Spain’s former Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo rained down on their parade, indicating that the Spanish government was adamantly opposed to the three-day visit.

“I said from the start that this visit was terribly unfortunate,” he told reporters at the end of a seminar in Madrid.

“The reaction in Spain is well-known.”

“We have not stopped taking measures,” Mr Margallo said when asked if the Spanish government will take extra actions in response to the visit.

It was the second time he had expressed dissatisfaction with the royal visit.

He had described it as “unfortunate both in timing and style” a month prior.

Tensions between the United Kingdom and Spain had risen as a result of a disagreement over fishing rights off the coast of the peninsula.

Fishermen in Spain were fighting for the right to fish. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

Share.

Leave A Reply