The EU is in shambles: Von der Leyen is facing opposition from 11 countries over the Commission’s main initiative.

0

The EU is in shambles: Von der Leyen is facing opposition from 11 countries over the Commission’s main initiative.

URSULA VON DER LEYEN expects 11 member states to vote against her Commission’s flagship Green Deal.

The European Commission released a comprehensive set of climate policies this week, including enforceable targets for countries to restore and increase forests, peatlands, and other natural “carbon sinks” that absorb CO2.

The regulations call for better protections for forests, which have diminished as a result of logging, biomass energy demand, and climate-related concerns including wildfires and pests.

However, 11 member states have already expressed their opposition to the flagship proposal, claiming that forest management should not fall under EU jurisdiction.

Tanczos Barna, Romania’s environment minister, said on Monday that his country backs the European Commission’s plan to protect forests and harness their power to combat climate change, but that additional discussions are needed to establish targets and funding sources.

He predicted that numerous EU countries, particularly Romania, which has the majority of Europe’s historic forests, will bear a greater portion of the monitoring and protection responsibilities.

Mr Barna told reporters, “A European forest plan is required.”

“Precise, ambitious goals are required, as are extremely clear definitions of old growth, secular, and main forests so that each member state understands its responsibilities.

“Financial, as well as the funding conditions and support that member states will receive when they agree to extraordinarily ambitious ambitions, must be discussed.”

Mr Barna said Romania was one of 11 EU member states, including Austria, Germany, Finland, Hungary, Poland, and the Czech Republic, to sign an open letter late last week requesting targeted debates on the policy in Brussels.

The United Kingdom will join the giant trading bloc by Christmas, according to the CPTPP.

“It should be highlighted that at the EU level, four countries will bear the weight of this monitoring and protection of primeval forests, as defined so far: Romania, Bulgaria, Finland, and Sweden,” he continued.

“As a result, the majority of forests older than 100 years will be concentrated in a few member states, which is why Romania is interested in this forestry plan establishing the financing conditions and support that member states will receive when they achieve the extraordinarily ambitious goals.”

Romania, which has some of Europe’s last surviving pristine forests and rich biodiversity, is losing an average of 20 million cubic meters of wood per year. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

Share.

Leave A Reply