The BBC has been slammed after a former announcer claimed that the elderly were kept off the radio to attract younger listeners.

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The BBC has been slammed after a former announcer claimed that the elderly were kept off the radio to attract younger listeners.

Former BBC broadcaster Danny Kelly said that elderly individuals were kept off the air because it would harm the corporation’s international brand and deter potential younger license fee payers.

During an interview with GB News on Wednesday, the former Beeb employee made the astonishing revelation. Mr Kelly was involved in a heated dispute with Tim Luckhurst, a journalist and the principal of Durham University’s South College, over whether the BBC is worth the money paid through the licence fee. Mr Kelly claimed that former BBC executives considered efforts to maintain the Beeb’s “international” reputation through allegedly ageist measures, despite license fee payers not giving a “damn” about what people on the other side of the globe thought of the organization.

Mr Kelly stated that he is “definitely not a proponent of defunding the BBC” since he does not believe the BBC should be cut.

But he persisted on how he disagreed with Mr Luckhurst, his “learned regarded colleague,” on the relevance of the BBC’s global standing.

Mr Kelly went on to say that, given the BBC’s audience in the United Kingdom, this was a fresh and irrelevant idea.

“You ask the ordinary 75-80 year old in the West Midlands or Liverpool if they care what people on the other side of the planet say of the BBC, and they don’t!” he asserted.

He added that he specifically targets that age range because of a disturbing request from his old BBC supervisors.

Mr Kelly claimed he was advised to “actively not put on” on older people when he first started broadcasting for the BBC in the West Midlands.

He stated that this was due to Beeb executives not wanting the radio station to “sound old” to younger listeners.

The BBC, according to the broadcaster, is “so anxious” about the future generation of licence fee payers that they don’t want old people on the radio in order to maintain their “global reputation.”

He hammered home the point that, despite the apparent refusal of “old folks” to appear on the radio, they must nevertheless pay the license fee.

Mr Luckhurst’s remarks came after a vehement defense of the corporation and its license fee demands.

Mr Luckhurst argued that the BBC is “worth every cent of that £159 license fee,” calling it “one of Britain’s greatest cultural exports.”

The Durham Principle was abolished. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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