Sturgeon was told to find a new consumer for independent Scotland’s electricity since the United Kingdom was planning to terminate links.

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Sturgeon was told to find a new consumer for independent Scotland’s electricity since the United Kingdom was planning to terminate links.

In the case of a secession from the UK, NICOLA STURGEON has been informed she may need to “find a new consumer” for Scotland’s excess renewable energy.

The leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP) has stated that a second referendum is “the desire of the country” and that it is a “matter of when, not if.” Following a fourth consecutive victory in the Scottish Parliament election, she issued a message to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, accusing him of “picking a war with the democratic desires of the Scottish people.” Mrs Sturgeon, on the other hand, risks losing a major energy partner if she is successful.

Electricity was an important aspect of the first independence struggle since Scotland has some of the best wind energy harvesting conditions in Europe.

In its 2014 independence plan, the Scottish government indicated that a single UK-wide market for electricity and gas should be maintained.

The government, on the other hand, maintained that there was no need to continue sharing the costs of a single integrated market, and that the arrangement “could not continue in its current form” — effectively breaking connections.

“I think Britain’s single energy market – where we are integrated as we are now, where energy flows across the border very easily – that makes our energy more secure, it keeps costs down, and it will enable us to go green, to go low carbon,” former UK Energy Secretary Ed Davey told BBC Radio Scotland’s Good Morning Scotland program.

“If you split something up, you get rid of all those benefits.

“As the UK’s secretary of state for energy and climate change, I’m quite concerned about what’s going on in Scotland.

“If I am no longer Scotland’s Secretary of State for Energy, I must prioritize the interests of consumers in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.”

“The essential issue is not what Scotland does at home, but whether it can sustain its impact in the United Kingdom from the outside,” risk analyst Adam Leech said at the time.

“If that is the case, it can continue to sell green energy to the rest of the UK.

“If not, it might have to look for a new customer.”

The government warned that if the complete bill is passed, family energy costs will rise by at least £38 and annual household prices will rise by up to £189. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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