Quotes and messages for Remembrance Day to honor the fallen.

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Quotes and messages for Remembrance Day to pay tribute to those who have died.

MILLIONS of people will remember those in the armed forces who fought and died in the line of duty today, November 11th.

We look at some of the most moving Remembrance Day poems and messages written in honor of those who died fighting in World Wars I and II.

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The Issa Valley by Czeslaw Milosz

“Praising what is gone makes the memory precious.”

Harold Nicolson was a British delegate to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919.

“It is critical that we recognize and honor our heroes and she-roes.”

Maya Angelou is a poet, author, and activist.

“Should our gratitude sleep when our dangers are over?”

aldrich, Thomas Bailey

“Everything we have in terms of freedom, everything we use or know – / This our fathers bought for us a long time ago.”

The Old Issue by Rudyard Kipling

“Tell them about us when you get home, and tell them that we gave our today for their tomorrow.”

Maxwell Edmonds, John Maxwell

“A hero’s legacy is the memory of a great name and the passing down of a great example.”

On February 1, 1849, Benjamin Disraeli gave a speech to the House of Commons.

“Only what you want to remember is remembered.”

Only what your heart permits you to know.”

“It is not to die if we live in the hearts of those we leave behind.”

“They will not grow old like the rest of us: age will not wear them down, and the years will not condemn them.”

We will remember them when the sun sets and when the sun rises.”

“We’ll miss you and want you, but when you return, we’ll cheer you up, thank you, and kiss you.”

“You only remember the things you want to remember.”

Only what your heart permits you to know.”

Laurence Binyon’s poem is probably the most well-known war poem in English.

It was first published in the Times on September 21, 1914, just two months after the First World War began on July 28. It is also known as the Ode of Remembrance.

Binyon was too old to enlist in the army during WWI, but he volunteered to help wounded French soldiers in hospitals.

Shortly after the Battle of Marne, he wrote For the Fallen in Cornwall:

They will not grow old like the rest of us: age will not wear them down, and the years will not condemn them. We will remember them at sundown and in the morning.

John McRae’s poem is written from the perspective of soldiers who have died and are buried.

In the First World War, McRae served as a doctor and Lieutenant Colonel with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in Boulogne, where he fought and oversaw medical care.

In January 1918, he died of pneumonia on the battlefield.

In the fields of Flanders, the…

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