Photos from the Sutton Hoo excavation have been digitized and donated to the National Trust.

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Photos from the Sutton Hoo excavation have been digitized and donated to the National Trust.

Thanks to digital technology, historic photos from the 1939 Sutton Hoo excavation will be kept for years to come.

Mercie’s great-nephew Andrew Lack has donated fragile photographs of the 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon ship burial shot by schoolteachers Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff to the National Trust. Experts have now converted the packed black and white prints, as well as 12 albums of images, one of which contains color photographs, into digital images that may be viewed starting today.

A warrior’s helmet, gold belt buckle, and shield discovered at the Suffolk site revolutionized our knowledge of 7th century history.

“I am thrilled to share my great-collection,” aunt’s Andrew remarked. She’d have been overjoyed. “One of her big passions remains Sutton Hoo.” The Dig, a Netflix film released this year, tells the story of Sutton Hoo. Edith Pretty, on whose land the ship was discovered, is played by Carey Mulligan, and archaeologist Basil Brown is played by Ralph Fiennes.

Mercie and Barbara took almost 60% of the dig images that were documented.

“By digitising the collection, the photos have been saved,” the National Trust said.

“They are freely accessible and can be enjoyed without causing harm to the originals.”

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