Now curry has been labeled as “racist” by a well-informed food blogger in the United Kingdom, who has been advised to “unlearn” the term.

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Now curry has been labeled as “racist” by a well-informed food blogger in the United Kingdom, who has been advised to “unlearn” the term.

According to an awakened food blogger, the word “curry” has been labeled a “racist” word that society must “unlearn” because of its roots to British colonization.

In a post that went viral, Chaheti Bansal stirred fury and amusement in equal measure when she asked people to “delete the word curry.” The 27-year-old Californian stated that the word was popularized by “white individuals who couldn’t be bothered to learn the true names of our meals.”

“Not in all cultures, but primarily in Indian cuisine since I don’t know what that word (curry) means,” she continued.

“There’s a saying in India that the food changes every 100 kilometers (62 miles), but we still use this umbrella word popularized by white people who couldn’t be bothered to learn the names of our foods.

“However, we still have the ability to unlearn.”

Later, she told NBC Asian America that her campaign isn’t about “completely eliminating the word,” but rather about “stopping its use by those who don’t know what it means.”

“When you think of south Asian food, curry shouldn’t be all that comes to mind,” she told the channel.

“You may drive about 100 kilometers (62 miles) and sample a whole different cuisine.

“On top of that, it’s an entirely other language and culture.

“And it simply goes to illustrate how much variation there is in our cuisine that goes unnoticed.”

Many Brits, though, were outraged by her remarks.

Simon McCoy, the host of GB News, called her statements “stupid” and claimed he was “losing the will to live.”

He added, jokingly, “What is it with folks in California?” It’s a curry, after all.”

Kirsty Gallacher, one of the co-hosts, was as harsh.

Many people on social media expressed their surprise at the chef’s strange remarks.

“I find tapas incredibly triggering,” one person wrote. Many tiny meals with unique names are deserving of more attention. It is incorrect to group them together.”

“Stew?” said a third. Although not all are the same, (a) general phrase is understood by everybody. Curry is the same way!

“Do these folks haven’t got anything going on in their lives…”

In the meantime, a third pondered, “Not curry?”

“We should avoid using the term ‘roast supper’ as a generic term in case somebody is outraged that it isn’t chicken, beef, lamb, or something else.”

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