Neighbour complains to the municipality about a man’s “unsightly” Saltire flagpole.

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Neighbour complains to the municipality about a man’s “unsightly” Saltire flagpole.

A MAN has claimed that his neighbor has complained about the flagpole in his lawn, which is flying the official Scottish national flag and has been regarded as “unsightly.”

James Ross of Dundonald received two official complaints about his flagpole from the same family. The five-metre pole is “unsightly,” according to the neighbors, and will have a “adverse impact on visual amenity” in the region.

“Noise disturbance from rattling/whistling and fluttering of the flag that forms a moving shadow,” the neighbors complained.

Mr Ross admitted that he was unaware that he needed to seek the council for permission to install the flagpole and apologized for not doing so.

He has since requested permission from South Ayrshire Council to erect the five-metre pole.

The application was approved, and the concerns that it was “unsightly” were dismissed.

“The proposed flagpole is not judged to have an adverse impact on the visual amenity of the locality,” the council said. “It is noticed from images provided within the submission that the flagpole is decked with the Scottish national flag” (Saltire).

The Saltire, also known as Saint Andrew’s Cross, is a heraldic emblem in the shape of a diagonal cross, similar to the shape of the letter X in Roman type. It is flown without the benefit of advertisement authorisation or planning permission.

It was employed in a variety of flags, including those representing Scotland and Burgundy in the 16th century, the Russian Navy’s ensign in the 18th century, and Ireland in the 19th century.

The Saltire, also known as Saint Andrew’s Cross, is a blue field with a white saltire on it.

Both the Scottish National Party and the Scottish Conservative Party utilize stylized saltires as their party logos, which are derived from the Scottish flag.

The controversy arises after the UK Government’s guidance on flying flags, titled “Flying Flags: A Plain English Guide,” was modified last month.

Following Britain’s exit from the EU, it removed the European Union flag from the list of flags that do not require permission to be flown on buildings as of July 20.

Scottish authorities had previously demanded that the European Union flag be flown over all Scottish government facilities.

The EU flag was asked to be flown on an in the Scottish Government’s flag flying guidance 2021, which was agreed by the First Minister. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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