‘It’s no coincidence that the EU messed up!’ The Vine panelists slam Brussels, claiming that the bloc is failing citizens.

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‘It’s no coincidence that the EU messed up!’ The Vine panelists slam Brussels, claiming that the bloc is failing citizens.

Olivia Utley, a panelist on JEREMY VINE’s show, launched a scathing attack on the European Union, claiming the union had “screwed up” its response to the coronavirus outbreak.

On Tuesday, the Telegraph’s Assistant Comment Editor appeared on the Jeremy Vine on Five programme, claiming that the European Union’s vaccination policy failure is “no coincidence.” Olivia Utley voiced her joy at the UK’s rejection of Brussels’ proposals to join a joint vaccination effort earlier in the pandemic. Ms. Utley then went on to chastise the EU for failing to provide for its citizens, implying that the EU’s structure was at the root of the “screwed up” approach pursued.

Jeremy Vine, the show’s host, claimed that the EU botched the vaccine campaign.

“They did,” Ms Utley said, “but I’m not sure if that’s a coincidence.”

“Imagine working in a large corporation where 12 individuals must sign off on a paper; it will be a slower, more clumsy process than having one or two people sign off on that document.”

“And that’s what we saw happen, so I don’t think it was a coincidence that the EU messed it all up,” she continued.

“I believe it was due to the fact that we are such a large organization.”

Then Jeremy Vine added, “As a result of being in the EU.”

In June of last year, all 27 EU member states agreed to join a plan giving the EU responsibility over vaccine procurement and distribution.

The EU, on the other hand, took longer than the UK to reach an agreement with AstraZeneca.

Early production and distribution issues plagued its relationships with Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.

President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen recognized the EU’s vaccine problems, adding, “We were late to authorise.” When it came to large-scale production, we were maybe overconfident that everything we bought would be delivered on time.”

The Pfizer vaccine, on the other hand, was approved in the UK in November 2020, roughly three weeks before EU regulators.

Westminster maintained that being outside the EU gave it more flexibility in this area.

AstraZeneca has begun shipping vaccine doses to the EU from a British plant.

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