In a face-to-face confrontation with the killer, Sarah Everard’s family expresses their sadness.

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In a face-to-face confrontation with the killer, Sarah Everard’s family expresses their sadness.

SARAH Everard’s courageous mother said in court that she is “tormented” by the memories of her daughter’s ordeal before her murder.

Susan Everard said she is “haunted” by the anguish of the marketing executive in the final hours of her life, when she was raped and murdered by police officer Wayne Couzens. He fraudulently detained her for violating Covid rules, held her hostage with his police handcuffs, strangled her with his police belt, and burned her body.

When Mrs Everard read an emotional witness statement before the Old Bailey, she came face to face with Couzens.

On March 3, Wayne Couzens kidnapped Everard, 33, from a London street, held her captive with his police handcuffs, strangled her with his police belt, and burned her body.

After unjustly detaining Sarah for violating Covid rules and handcuffing her arms behind her back, the Everards were forced to listen to terrible details of how Couzens, 48, raped and strangled her with his police belt.

On the evening of March 3, he targeted marketing executive Sarah, 33, as she walked home on Clapham Common in south London.

He dumped her body in an abandoned fridge on distant countryside and lit it alight with petrol, which Mrs Everard described as “the last insult” after killing her 80 miles away near Dover, Kent.

The victim impact statements given by Sarah’s relatives were among the most moving heard at the Old Bailey.

“The sorrow of loss is so great it is visceral,” charity worker Mrs Everard said as Couzens sat in the dock, head bowed. And, along with the sadness, comes the fear of not being able to see her again.

“I’ll never be able to speak to her, hold her, or be a part of her life again. We retained her dressing gown, which still smells like her, and I hug it instead of hugging her.” “Her loss creates a vast chasm in our lives that cannot be filled,” Sarah’s mother, who also has a son, told Couzens.

“I pine for her.” I recall all the wonderful qualities she possessed: she was compassionate and amusing. She was not only intelligent, but she was also practical. She was a stunning performer on the dance floor. She was an excellent daughter.” Mr Everard, an electronics professor at the University of York, ordered Couzens face him so he could hear him answer, “No punishment.”

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