‘He was fantastic.’ The Buckingham Palace gardener, according to Prince Charles, awakened a love for nature in him.

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‘He was fantastic.’ The Buckingham Palace gardener, according to Prince Charles, awakened a love for nature in him.

PRINCE CHARLES has spoken about how a “wonderful” former Buckingham Palace gardener influenced his love of nature.

The Prince of Wales, 72, recalls how Fred Nutbeam assisted him and his sister, the Princess Royal, 70, with their childhood “small garden.” The Queen’s eldest son explains Mr Nutbeam’s essential role in a documentary slated to air tonight while speaking with Poet Laureate Simon Armitage about his early encounter of nature.

At 7.15 p.m., Radio 4’s The Poet Laureate Has Gone To His Shed airs.

“There was a great head gardener at Buckingham Palace, he was called Mr Nutbeam, and he was rather splendidly,” Charles said.

“He was wonderful, and he even assisted my sister and myself with our small garden.”

Mr Nutbeam was claimed to have wheeled the Royal children about Buckingham Palace in a wheelbarrow at one point.

“Fred told me he used to drive Charles, Anne, Andrew, and Edward about the grounds in a wheelbarrow,” Jim Buttress, a former Superintendent of the Royal Parks, told The Sunday Times in 2016.

Mr. Nutbeam was the head gardener at Buckingham Palace for approximately 25 years before retiring in 1978.

In addition, Queen Elizabeth II made him a member of the Royal Victorian Order.

Mr. Nutbeam passed away in 1997.

The future King went on to remark that he and Princess Anne had “a lot of fun” growing tomatoes in their “small vegetable plot.”

“In the back of some border somewhere, my sister and I had a little vegetable patch,” he explained.

“We had a lot of fun attempting to grow tomatoes, which we failed at, and other stuff like that.”

Nothing beats homemade cuisine, according to the Prince of Wales.

“I don’t think there’s anything to beat eating what you’ve grown,” Charles added.

“This is just another reason why I believe it is critical to find ways to encourage students to grow veggies and other items at school.”

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