‘He wants to participate!’ Prince Philip taught Prince William’s children about his passion.

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PRINCE PHILIP had a passion for gardening and used to share his hobby with his great-grandchildren.

The late Duke of Edinburgh loved spending time with Kate and William’s children, George, Charlotte, and Louis, at the garden of the Old Boot Inn pub in Stanford Dingley. The pub is near the home of Kate’s mum and dad – Carole and Michael Middleton.

Prince Philip was even patron of the Charity Fields in Trust, which supports green spaces and protects them.

After the Duke of Edinburgh’s death, who tragically passed away in April, just a few months before his 100th birthday, Prince William took over and became the patron of the charity.

The Duke of Edinburgh was reportedly a fan of Kate. The Duke apparently turned to the Queen during Prince William’s 2011 wedding and said: “Thank goodness he didn’t give her up.”

The late duke had a love for gardening – something he shared with Kate and William who love gardening and being outdoors.

In May this year, the royal couple travelled to Starbank Park in Edinburgh to meet teenagers planting sunflowers as part of their Duke of Edinburgh awards.

Kate planted an apple tree and William was shown how to plant seeds.

The Prince told them: “You’re very good gardeners.”

Prince William added: “You’ve got free labour, free help.”

The Duke of Edinburgh was a talented gardener, and according to his grandchildren, he designed the Rose Garden at Windsor Castle and managed Sandringham Estate all on his own.

During the BBC One programme, ‘Prince Philip: The Royal Family Remembers’, Princess Eugenie stood in the grounds at Windsor Castle and was being interviewed in the Rose Garden.

Princess Eugenie told the interviewer: “I didn’t know that Grandpa designed the garden, but also the lotus flower in the middle of the fountain.”

Philip was a warden and managed the Estates since 1952.

According to Prince William, the late Duke of Edinburgh planted over 40 kilometres of hedge land, 45 woods, and over two million trees at Sandringham.

William continued: “These things really matter to the makeup of the surrounding area. [Philip] doesn’t like to just talk and waffle, he wants to get involved and do it himself.”

He was also a ranger of Windsor Great Park from 1952 until his death in 2021.

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