Going to the john at night time can hurt your well being – and your CAREER

NEW FINDINGS suggest that popping to the toilet more than once a night can make a serious dent in your work performance

Getting up in the night for a wee seems like the kind of things most people do. But a new study reveals that a midnight tinkle could be harmful to your health – and to your career.

People who get up more than once in the night to go to the loo are generally something like two per cent less happy with their lives and they will lose an average of seven days of effective work a year because their tiredness results in sickness or sub-par performance.

That’s according to a study of nocturia – that’s the technical name for regular night time urination – by the RAND Europe Research Institute.

Estimates on the number of people that suffer from nocturia suggest that, even though it increases with age, the condition also affects around one in ten individuals aged 45 or younger. Women are more likely to suffer than men.

Nocturia affects, overall, around 9.1 million people in the UK. Of those approximately 5.7 million are of working age.

“Given the economic implications, this should be a wake-up call”

Report author Marco Hafner

The study reports that doctors and health practitioners often overlook nocturia as a potential health problem associated with sleep loss, and patients may delay reporting the condition until it becomes unbearable and is substantially affecting their wellbeing.

The RAND study estimates the total cost to the UK economy at $6billion (around £4.6 billion)

And the personal cost is impossible to calculate. Nocturia has been linked to depression and to cardiovascular disease. 

The study was based on answers from 58,300 people worldwide.

Lead author Marco Hafner said: “Frequent visits to the bathroom at night can affect the quality of people’s sleep which can be extremely bothersome for some.

“It can have a negative impact on their general feelings of wellness and also means they feel less engaged at work and their ability to perform at work may be impaired.

“Doctors often overlook nocturia as a potential health problem associated with sleep loss, and patients can delay reporting the condition until it becomes unbearable and substantially affects their wellbeing.

“Given the economic implications, this should be a wake-up call.”

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