Egypt’s royal mummies have caused consternation on the Nile’s banks, as the Pharaohs’ Curse threatens to reappear.

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Egypt’s royal mummies have caused consternation on the Nile’s banks, as the Pharaohs’ Curse threatens to reappear.

EGYPT’S royal mummies previously caused consternation on the Nile’s banks, and similar unsettling worries have been made about the so-called Pharaohs’ Curse.

The Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square relocated 22 ancient Egyptian monarchs to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation (NMEC) in Fustat over the weekend. The event, dubbed “The Pharaohs Golden Parade,” featured a beautiful parade of 18 ancient kings and four queens in individual golden floats through the streets of Cairo. The mummies passed murals of pharaonic scenes against a backdrop of fireworks with singers and dancers, and the roads along the Nile were closed as the artefacts were transported in their own capsule filled with nitrogen to provide extra protection – and the mummies passed murals of pharaonic scenes against a backdrop of fireworks with singers and dancers.

However, this was not the mummies’ first visit.

Soon after many of the New Kingdom rulers were laid to rest in the Valley of the Kings some 3,000 years ago, most were moved to secret caches to protect them from tomb robbers.

These were rediscovered in the late 1800s, and the mummies resumed their journey up the Nile on steamships, eventually settling in Cairo museums.

Locals lined the riverbanks to lament the departure in 1881, causing scenes of worry.

“Women with dishevelled hair ran along the banks and wailing the death wail,” according to a newspaper account.

“As the Pharaohs passed, men stood in reverent silence, shooting their firearms into the air.”

When the royals arrived in Cairo, customs authorities were unable to locate “mummy” on the list of items permitted entry into the city.

The 22 mummies have been housed in four different museums since their creepy river journey.

And this weekend’s occurrence has raised fears that the so-called Pharaohs’ Curse has resurfaced.

After Howard Carter discovered Tutankhamen’s tomb in 1922, bad luck was reported to have started.

Six archaeologists died within months of opening the boy king’s sarcophagus, as did Lord Carnarvon, the expedition’s sponsor, among many other bizarre happenings.

Some have blamed the procession for a recent fatal train accident in central Egypt, a building collapse in Cairo, and a strange blockade of the Suez Canal — despite the fact that such accusations are unfounded.

Dr. Zahi Hawass, a famous archaeologist, disputed the idea, saying, “There is no such thing.” Brinkwire Summary News

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