Coronavirus: This pandemic may not be “the big”

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Around the world, the coronavirus is still raging, taking more and more lives. But a new alert has been given that “the big one.” might not be this pandemic.

But was it too devastating?

To date, there have been some 82 million infections and nearly 1.8 million deaths in 188 countries, with the virus still circulating, including in areas where outbreaks were initially effectively contained.

But isn’t that the “big one?”

“This pandemic has been very large. It has affected every corner of the planet. But this is not necessarily the big pandemic.”This pandemic has been very large. Every corner of the planet has been affected. But this is not necessarily the great pandemic.

So the menace persists.

Ryan added that this could serve as a “wake-up call…. These threats will continue. One thing we need to take away from this pandemic, with all the tragedies and casualties, is that we need to get our act together.”

On the same page is the UN?

“learn lessons from the coronavirus pandemic”learn lessons from the coronavirus pandemic”greater investment in preparedness to respond to future health emergencies.”greater investment in preparedness to respond to future health emergencies.”As we strive to control and recover from the current pandemic, we need to think about the next one.  Unfortunately, it’s easy to imagine a virus that is just as contagious but even more deadly.”We need to think about the next one as we strive to control and recover from the current pandemic.

The connection between humans and animals?

The Director-General of the United Nations World Health Organisation, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said that 75% of current and emerging human infectious diseases are zoonotic, that is, caused by germs that spread between animals and humans. He said, “All efforts to improve human health are doomed to fail if they don’t address the critical human-animal interface.”

What will be done?

The experts call on nations to work together to “to pay greater attention to human and livestock intrusion into animal habitats.” A “One Health Approach” will also be implemented, which covers human health, animal health, plant health and environmental factors, and calls for countries to invest in preparedness to “prevent, detect and mitigate emergencies” and to strengthen health and health care systems in countries where possible.

But are all countries going to get onboard?

A team of international scientists is expected to fly to Wuhan, China, to investigate the source of Covid-19 later this month – the virus is thought to have originated from a market where animals were sold in Wuhan. The WHO said it was not looking for a “guilty country” but wanted to “understand what happened” and minimize potential risks, but Beijing declined to engage in an impartial investigation and also allowed the team to negotiate during the necessary months.

Isn’t China on the same list, then?

Once home to bats with the closest known relative of the covid-19 virus, a bat research team visiting a mineshaft in southern China was able to take samples, but it was confirmed that those samples were confiscated, while coronavirus specialists were ordered not to talk to the press and a team of Associated Press journalists were pursued by plain clothes Chinese police who blocked access to sites

But does the UN keep calling for cooperation?

“No one is safe unless all of us are safe. As we recover from the pandemic, we should resolve to build our prevention capacity so that we are ready when the world faces the next outbreak.”No one is safe unless we are all safe. We should decide to build our prevention capacity as we recover from the pandemic, so that we are ready when the world faces the next outbreak.

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