Coronavirus Scotland: postponed second dose of Pfizer vaccine

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In Scotland, people who were due to obtain their second dose of next week’s Covid 19 vaccine were told their dates would be put back by months.

In order to encourage more people to undergo their first vaccine, patients and health workers who had planned to be completely vaccinated within a month now face delays of 12 weeks.

The delay was confirmed by Chief Medical Officer Gregor Smith on Friday, who said that after only one vaccine, patients would be safe.

He said the move was made so that vaccines for those who have not yet received their first dose could be prioritized.

In the U.K. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization of the Government also declared Friday that they want to prioritize “as many people as possible on the JCVI Phase 1 priority list.”

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This is despite a recommendation from vaccine manufacturer Pfizer, which claims that there is no evidence to indicate that safety is sustained at 21 days after the first dose.

A statement by Dr. Gregor Smith, Chief Medical Officer of Scotland, reads, “Those services that will be in operation from Monday, January 4, 2021, should ensure that all second dose appointments are booked in the twelfth week following the first dose.”

“I recognize that the requirement to reschedule second appointments is operationally difficult in the short term and may be unpopular with patients booked for a second dose in the immediate future,” he said.

“But for every 1,000 people boosted with a second dose of Covid 19 vaccine in January (and who receive marginal protection as a result), 1,000 new people would receive very substantial initial protection late, which should lift them from 0 percent protection to at least 70 percent protection in most cases within typically 14 to 21 days.”

Data from the Phase 3 trial showed that while partial vaccine safety appears to begin as early as 12 days after the first dose, two doses of the vaccine are needed to achieve full disease protection, a vaccine efficacy of 95%,”Data from the Phase 3 trial have shown that although partial protection from the vaccine appears to begin as early as 12 days after the first dose, two doses of the vaccine are required to achieve maximum protection against the disease, a vaccine efficacy of 95 percent.”

“There are no data to show that protection after the first dose continues after 21 days.”

Dr. Christine Tait-Burkard of the University of Edinburgh said on Friday that it made sense to vaccinate more of the population to prevent the virus from spreading and make the vaccine last longer.

Overall, it makes sense to vaccinate more of the population,”Overall it makes sense to vaccinate more of the population, but I understand there is some concern for people who were already scheduled for the second dose of the vaccine, and they will have to wait longer, but the protection is very good from a single dose.”but I understand there is some concern for people who are already scheduled for the second dose of the vaccine, and they will have to wait longer, but the protection from a single dose is very good.

She assumes that the Pfizer vaccine will only be used by people at risk, while the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine can be carried out much quicker, for which more doses are available.

“the NHS is under so much strain from rising covid case numbers that this needs to be done with extra help.”the NHS is under so much strain from growing case numbers of covids that this needs to be done with additional assistance.

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