Comparing the size of the Amazon Rainforest to the size of the Earth’s lungs reveals the astonishing destruction of the planet’s lungs. MAPPED

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Comparing the size of the Amazon Rainforest to the size of the Earth’s lungs reveals the astonishing destruction of the planet’s lungs. MAPPED

The Amazon Rainforest is rapidly disappearing, shedding 4,281 square miles between August 2019 and July 2020, a 9.5 percent increase over the previous year.

Each year, the number of significant wildfires in the Amazon rainforest grows, with 24 large fires so far this year. When the first large blaze was lit on land cleared in 2021, all of these major flames were set on territory previously vanquished in 2020. But how much of the Amazon Rainforest has already been lost?

One million indigenous people and three million plant and animal species live in the Amazon Rainforest.

The moniker Lungs of Earth comes from the fact that the region produces 20% of the world’s oxygen.

The rainforest is the world’s most biodiverse zone, yet it has been devastated by wildfires in recent years.

The 2021 fire season started a few weeks ago, with the majority of burning flames blamed on land degradation in 2020, emphasizing the link between deforestation and fires.

Between 1990 and 2015, chainsaws, fire, and cement destroyed 129 million hectares of forest around the world.

Deforestation is accelerating at an alarming rate, with roughly 10 hectares of forest being lost every minute.

The rest is largely due to human activities such as agriculture, raw material exploitation, and urbanization.

Every year, millions of hectares of rainforest in the Amazon, Congo, and Southeast Congo are lost.

The Amazon Biome covers 6.7 million square kilometers, more than twice the area of India.

It has the world’s largest remaining tropical rainforest, and its river discharges 15 to 16 percent of the world’s total river discharge into the oceans.

The Amazon contains dense tropical forest, as well as savannas, floodplain forests, grasslands, marshes, bamboos, and palm forests, among other forms of vegetation.

Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, and Suriname, as well as the French overseas region of French Guiana, share the biome.

The Amazon is losing far too much of its forest cover.

According to WWF, the rainforest has lost 17 percent of its forest cover during the last five decades.

Its connection has deteriorated, and many endemic species have been subjected to resource extraction in waves.

Cattle farming was responsible for the majority of the deforestation (80%).

“Brinkwire Summary News,” for example.

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