Census blunder: For Jesus’ birthdate, Roman records revealed a ‘glitch in calculation.’

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Census blunder: For Jesus’ birthdate, Roman records revealed a ‘glitch in calculation.’

EVERY HOUSEHOLD IN ENGLAND, WALES, AND NORTHERN IRELAND WILL CONDUCT A CENSUS THIS WEEKEND, AND ANCIENT RECORDS ON JESUS SHOW EXACTLY WHY IT IS IMPORTANT.

Homeowners have been told that failing to complete the census form by Sunday, March 21 might result in a fine of up to £1,000. By asking questions about who you live with, the sort of home you live in, and your job status, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) hopes to create a “full image of the nation.” A census is an ancient process that dates back to 1801 in the United Kingdom, but is considerably older around the world.

It was employed as a list to keep track of all adult males fit for military duty throughout the Roman Republic.

During his “Drive Thru History” series, host Dave Stotts highlighted what the ancient records may also tell about Jesus’ birth.

“The Roman census was not well received,” he remarked. One of the main reasons Rome went to such lengths to conduct a census was to ensure that people were paying the taxes the Romans requested.

“The Roman census was seen as another mocking of the Jewish people’s ancient, religious ideals by the Jewish people, who had experienced years of outside control.

“However, the Roman census was not voluntary, and the average Joe, or Joseph, had no real way of resisting it.

“If you look closely at our western calendar and piece together the calendar of events around Christ’s birth, you will quickly notice a problem.”

Mr. Stotts explained how modern calendars came to understand Jesus’ birth as taking place in the year 1AD.

“According to our calendar, Jesus should have been born in 1AD, why?” he said.

“Because the Church divided the calendar into two eras a long time ago: Before Christ and Anno Domini, or in our Lord’s year.

“According to it, Jesus should have been born in the year 1AD, but there was a minor error in the calculations that led to the creation of our calendar.

“In 525 AD, Pope John I commissioned Dionysius, a monk, to develop a common calendar for the Western world.

“He changed the Alexandrian system of dating, which had been employed as a baseline measure during the reign of Roman Emperor Diocletian.”

Mr. Stotts explained how he did it. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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