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Bungling Education Secretary Gavin Williamson fighting to cling on to his job after A Levels meltdown

BUNGLING Gavin Williamson is fighting to cling on to his Cabinet job in the wake of the A Levels meltdown.

No10 is livid with the Education Secretary after he presided over a string of humiliating school disasters.

He U-turned on a vow to get all primary school pupils back to class before summer, and sparked nationwide fury with the marking shambles.

And if next week’s GCSE results end up in an A Levels-style disaster, it could be the final straw for his Cabinet career.

Cabinet colleagues have sharpened their knives against Mr Williamson, with one cruelly comparing him to the gaffe-prone Frank Spencer in the sitcom Some Mothers Do Ave Em.

They told The Sun: “It turns out putting Frank Spencer in charge of running schools wasn’t a good idea.”

Meanwhile, a growing number of furious Tory MPs joined the backlash against the A Level marking chaos.

A staggering 39 per cent of marks were controversially downgraded by a computer moderating system – sparking a mutiny among teachers, pupils and parents.

Julian Sturdy, the Tory MP for York, called for the grades to be ripped up and the higher teacher marks dished out in a Scotland-style U-turn.

He fumed: “These are unprecedented times.

“We should be looking after these students’ futures rather than worrying about grade inflation.”

Tory MP for Telford Lucy Allan lashed: “An algorithm that awards a ‘U’ to a student that did not have the chance to turn up for an exam is fundamentally flawed.”

It comes as ministers are braced for an even bigger row when GCSE results are handed out next week.

These grades have also been moderated by a computer, and experts have warned of absolute carnage as hundreds of thousands of kids find out their results.

Another Tory MP warned: “What has happened with A levels is going to be a cup of tea compared to next week.”

Mr Williamson has insisted the results had to be moderated otherwise grade inflation would have gone supersonic, leaving kids with worthless qualifications.

But the Labour Party was also plunged into chaos after they carried out a screeching U-turn on their A Levels policy.

Angela Rayner hit the airwaves demanding teacher’s predicted grades are used, just months after she said they could not be trusted.

The deputy leader told the BBC: “We believe the only option that the Government have got now is to go back to the teacher-awarded grades because they’ve made such a fiasco.”

But back in April she backed the moderation of teacher grades.

She told FE News: “We have always said predicted grades are not always accurate, and can disproportionately affect the children who need the most support, and we pushed ministers to ensure students can sit an exam later if they wish.”

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