As she begs for a Universal Credit boost extension, a desperate mother sobs.

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As she begs for a Universal Credit boost extension, a desperate mother sobs.

A WOMAN with multiple organ disease brought on by long-term Covid wept on Radio 5 Live as she urged with the government to keep the £20-a-week Universal Credit increase.

Gemma told Adrian Chiles on Tuesday that she was working in a care home before contracting the virus, but that she now has “serious health difficulties” as a result of long-term Covid complications. The distraught mother, who was choked up, said she will now have to make life-changing decisions as a result of the Universal Credit boost decrease, which takes effect today and affects 4.4 million people.

“I won’t be able to pay for my prescription, I won’t be able to pay for my daughter’s dance lessons – I won’t be able to pay for even necessities,” Gemma explained.

“I was expecting for a small boost in Universal Credit because I won’t be able to pay rent or anything.”

She also revealed on the show that she has been left with significant lengthy Covid.

She has “heart disease, liver disease, and lung disease” as a result of the disorder, she claimed.

Doctors “still don’t know how long it’ll last,” Gemma said.

The frantic mother concluded that the situation had been “life-changing,” and that she feared for the future as her financial situation deteriorated.

The reduction in the uplift will cost users £1,040 per year, forcing many to face difficult choices in their life, with many claiming they would have to pick between food and heating this winter.

The reduction follows a decision by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), which determined that due to the COVID-19 outbreak, every person receiving Universal Credit should get a £20 weekly boost.

However, the Department for Work and Pensions claims that this increase was always intended to be a temporary measure, and that while it was originally scheduled to cease in March 2021, it was prolonged until October as Britain battled to recover from the pandemic.

It comes as the temporary increase has been dubbed “the single biggest overnight slash in the history of the welfare state,” hitting one out of every fourteen British workers.

While NGOs have warned that removing the uplift may increase poverty among the six million Universal Credit applicants.

According to research, 40% of these claims – almost two million people – “Brinkwire News Summary.”

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