After declaring a mid-flight emergency, a BA flight to London was forced to make an emergency landing.

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After declaring a mid-flight emergency, a BA flight to London was forced to make an emergency landing.

A MID-AIR EMERGENCY has been declared on a BRITISH AIRWAYS flight to London.

The plane was flying from Edinburgh Airport to Heathrow Airport in London when the emergency was declared.

A squawking alarm number 7700 was emitted by the BA1441 aircraft, indicating a widespread but vague emergency.

Shortly after 10 a.m., the Airbus A319-131 departed Scotland.

As a precaution, the pilots reported a “small mechanical issue” on board and phoned Air Traffic Control to request a priority landing in London.

“Our pilots requested a priority landing at Heathrow as a precaution due to a small technical issue,” a BA spokesman said.

“The plane made a safe landing.”

According to flightRadar24, the domestic flight departed Edinburgh at 10.17 a.m. for the 331-mile route.

It was expected to arrive at 11.50 a.m. at Heathrow Airport.

However, thanks to the priority landing slot, the plane arrived in the city at 11:33 a.m.

A jet traveling from Scotland has declared an emergency for the second time in less than 24 hours.

After departing Glasgow Prestwick Airport on Thursday morning, a US military aircraft issued a Squawk 7700.

On Tuesday, an Eastern Airways flight from Aberdeen to Sumburgh notified controllers of an issue.

A squawk code is a four-digit number that allows Air Traffic Control and aircraft to communicate quickly.

Each code starts with a digit between zero and seven.

All emergencies on board a flight are communicated using the squawk 7700 code, which sends an immediate alarm to all adjacent watchtowers.

A squawk 7600 code, for example, is used to notify Air Traffic Control that a jet has lost connection with the tower.

In a hijacking, a squawk 7500 alert is used to notify the tower that the plane wants immediate security assistance.

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