After agreeing to the “biggest deal in history,” the EU is at odds with Pfizer over vaccine price hikes.

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After agreeing to the “biggest deal in history,” the EU is at odds with Pfizer over vaccine price hikes.

BRUSSELS and BioNTech/Pfizer, the vaccine provider, are at odds over the cause for the vaccine’s price hike. The dispute arose after the European Union and Pfizer agreed to the “biggest supply contract in the history of the pharmaceutical sector.”

The coronavirus vaccine manufacturers ridiculed Clement Beaune, Emmanuel Macron’s right-hand man, for claiming that vaccination prices will rise because they need to be retooled to fight against the current versions. According to Mr. Beaune, the new pricing of the Pfizer antidote reflects an adjustment to the Delta variety.

“Having more rigorous contracts with products suited to the variants will — probably, yeah — be a little more expensive, not only for the EU, but for all buyers,” he told Radio France Internationale.

“The vaccination doses that the EU is discussing with Pfizer and other laboratories are not the same as the first generation of vaccines,” he continued.

“They’re being tailored to the variants, as specified by the contracts under negotiation.”

On Monday, however, Zlem Türeci, BioNTech’s chief medical officer, denied that a third booster will be required for either the Delta or Beta varieties.

The EU has agreed to buy 900 million more doses of the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine, with the possibility of buying another 900 million.

This is the “largest supply contract in the history of the pharmaceutical industry,” according to the pharmaceutical business.

The agreement is designed to ensure that the EU can give booster doses.

Concerns about waning immune protection in the face of the highly contagious Delta variant, as well as the possibility of worse strains emerging, the German biotech firm said that offering a third dose of its established two-shot vaccine remained the best response to concerns about waning immune protection in the face of the highly contagious Delta variant.

BioNTech stated the supply total of over one billion doses as of July 21 was an increase over the 700 million-plus doses it disclosed in June.

Last month, AstraZeneca and its manufacturing partner Serum Institute of India announced that they had shipped a billion doses of their vaccine around the world.

BioNTech plans to generate 15.9 billion euros in revenue from the vaccine this year, up from a May prediction of 12.4 billion euros, based on supply contracts signed for more than 2.2 billion doses so far, according to a statement detailing its second quarter performance.

BioNTech said that this includes sales, milestone payments, and a percentage of gross profit in its partners’ areas.

Pfizer is running late. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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