According to the BBC’s Moscow correspondent, press freedom and free expression in Russia are diminishing.

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According to the BBC’s Moscow correspondent, press freedom and free expression in Russia are diminishing.

Following her expulsion from the nation, the BBC’s Moscow correspondent claims that Russia is “in reverse” in terms of press freedom and free expression.

Sarah Rainsford was notified last month that she would be expelled for life by Russia’s FSB security service after two decades of reporting from Moscow. She enraged followers of Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko, a close ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin, this year by questioning him about the treatment of nonviolent protestors.

She spoke with Russian journalists in her final report, and a Dozhd TV employee warned they must identify their “hostile” status before publishing any news.

“I am leaving a country I originally came to as the Soviet Union crumbled, when liberties were fresh and precious…,” she ended.

Russia now is sliding backwards.”

The embargo was imposed in retribution for British officials refusing to extend a visa to a Russian journalist, according to a Russian foreign ministry spokesman.

“Russian journalists continue to operate freely in the UK, provided they act within the law,” the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office of the United Kingdom said.

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