According to a demonstrator, hundreds of people are willing to go to jail over the Insulate Britain campaign.

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According to a demonstrator, hundreds of people are willing to go to jail over the Insulate Britain campaign.

AFTER NINE Individuals WERE JAILED THIS WEEK FOR VIOLATING HIGH COURT INJUNCTIONS, AN INSULATE Britain protester stated that the movement has “hundreds” of people willing to go to prison.

The protestors were jailed on Wednesday after admitting to breaking an injunction by blocking the M25 at junction 25 during morning rush hour on October 8. Judges have concluded that they must only pay half of National Highways’ “excessive” legal fees claim. Craig Scudder, meanwhile, has pledged to continue protesting and has stated that he is “ready” to go to prison.

Mr Scudder, speaking to GB News, said: “I’m willing to go to prison myself, and I know hundreds of others who are as well.

“Let’s see who is the first to blink.

“Let’s see how many rooms the government has to lock us up in and how much support we can get.”

Ben Buse, 36, Roman Paluch-Machnik, 28, Oliver Rock, 41, Emma Smart, 44, Tim Speers, 36, and James Thomas, 47, received three-month sentences, while Ben Buse, 36, Roman Paluch-Machnik, 28, Oliver Rock, 41, Emma Smart, 44, Tim Speers, 36, and James Thomas, 47, received four-month penalties.

Dame Victoria Sharp condemned them as “inflammatory” and a “call to arms” on Tuesday.

Because the group’s acts were so serious and they had made it obvious they planned to continue flouting court orders, the judge, who was sitting alongside Mr Justice Chamberlain, said there was no alternative to prison sentences.

National Highways’ lawyer, Myriam Stacey QC, previously stated that the legal costs of the contempt proceedings amounted to slightly over £91,000, and she sought the court to force the demonstrators to pay.

However, the two judges determined in a written decision issued after the hearing that while it was reasonable to require the imprisoned campaigners to pay some legal bills, National Highways’ alleged costs were “excessive.”

National Highways’ payments included sums for advice from two senior barristers, four junior barristers, and supplementary fees for three barristers, according to the investigation.

“Even taking into account the requirement to evaluate very considerable material,” Dame Victoria added, “we consider that these costs were excessive.”

The two justices also stated that three solicitors attending the High Court hearing was not “reasonable.”

Each of the activists was ordered to pay £5,000 towards National Highways’ costs by Dame Victoria and Mr Justice Chamberlain, for a total of £45,000.

Insulate Britain has stated that it plans to continue its work. “Brinkwire News Summary.”

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