A statue of a woman in a see-through clothing has sparked a sexist debate, with the artist claiming that she should be naked.

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A statue of a woman in a see-through clothing has sparked a sexist debate, with the artist claiming that she should be naked.

IN ITALY, A STATUE OF A WOMAN IN A SEE-THRU DRESS has sparked a sexism debate.

The bronze monument represents a peasant woman wearing a long, thin robe that clings to her body and was revealed near the beachfront in the Italian town of Sapri. The statue is a dedication to the 1857 poem La Spigolatrice di Sapri (The Gleaner of Sapri) by sculptor Emanuele Stifano.

The artwork was presented on Saturday, and images show a large group of men encircling it, including former Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte.

Stifano’s work has since been condemned by various legislators as a “offence to women” and an example of “male chauvinism.”

“The recently inaugurated statue in Sapri dedicated to Spigolatrice is an outrage to women and to the history it should celebrate,” remarked Laura Boldrini, a Democratic MP, on Twitter.

“However, how can institutions allow the sexualization of women’s bodies?” Male chauvinism is one of Italy’s ills.” The statue, which was recently unveiled in #Sapri and is dedicated to #Spigolatrice, is a tribute to women and a historical event that should be commemorated.

But how can institutions finally accept a woman’s representation as a sexually active body?

Maschialismo is one of Italy’s ills. pic.twitter.com/2msLhgJvso Senator Monica Cirinnà of the Democratic Party slammed the statue, calling it a “slap in the face of history and to women who are still just sexualized bodies.”

“This Gleaner statue says nothing about the self-determination of a woman who chose not to work in order to fight the oppressor.”

Another group of Democratic Party female lawmakers urged for the statue to be demolished. “Once again, we must bear the humiliation of seeing ourselves depicted in the form of a sexualized body, devoid of soul and disconnected from the story’s social and political themes,” they stated. Emanuele Stifano defended his work, claiming that if he had his way, the woman would have been “totally naked…simply because I love the human body.”

“I am astonished and dismayed by what I am reading,” he stated in a statement. I usually try to hide as little of the human body as possible when I produce a sculpture, regardless of gender.

“Because it was on the beachfront, I took advantage of the sea wind that surrounded it,” says Brinkwire Summary News.

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