A fraudster impersonating my daughter on WhatsApp defrauded me of £6,500, and my bank is unable to recover it.

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A fraudster impersonating my daughter on WhatsApp defrauded me of £6,500, and my bank is unable to recover the funds.

After claiming that a fraudster posed as her daughter on WhatsApp, a GRAN was left £6,500 in debt.

Teresa Griffiths assumed the texts were sent by her daughter, who was upset about an unpaid bill and offered to pay it.

However, she claims the messages were from a scammer, and that the gullible 62-year-old handed over £6,572 before realising she had been duped.

Teresa, from Bedfont, West London, was devastated to discover she had lost the money she had been saving for a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Las Vegas for her 60th birthday.

In June of this year, the single mother of two was targeted, and she claims she was sickened to learn that her bank, Santander, was unable to help her recover the funds.

Teresa claims she was relaxing in her garden with friends when she received the first WhatsApp message from the fraudster, which said “hi mum.”

The messages continued to say they had dropped their phone down the toilet and had a new number, according to her.

“The messages were written exactly how my daughter, Louise, writes texts,” Teresa said.

The messages continued to say they had forgotten to pay a bill for £2,780, as if she was texting her 40-year-old daughter, Louise Scott, who was having building work done at the time.

“I offered her the money,” Teresa said.

I assumed it had something to do with the housework she was having done.

“I thought I was paying the builder directly even after they gave me a different bank account.”

“Yes, it was stupid of me to offer assistance, but they would have asked anyway, and that’s where it would have ended up.”

“I’m a mother and grandmother, and I wanted to help – these con artists prey on mothers who want to help their children, and it’s a natural reaction to offer assistance if you can.”

Teresa was then asked to pay for a second forgotten bill totaling £3,792, and within minutes she had transferred thousands of pounds from her savings account, oblivious to the fact that it wasn’t her daughter.

Teresa, on the other hand, was alarmed when the con artist pushed their luck and demanded a third payment of £2,120.

“I paid them £6,572 over two transactions,” she explained.

“When I said I didn’t have it and they asked for more, they said just pay what you have.”

That’s when I realized she didn’t sound anything like my daughter.”

I’m a mother and grandmother who wanted to help – these con artists prey on mothers who want to help their children, and it’s natural to want to help if you can.

Worryingly, Teresa claims that when she asked the scammer for the names of her grandchildren, he said they…

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