Type 2 diabetes: People who have the disease at a given age are more likely to develop dementia.

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Type 2 diabetes: People who have the disease at a given age are more likely to develop dementia.

TYPE 2 diabetes is a long-term illness in which elevated blood sugar levels can harm the body. Researchers had previously connected type 2 diabetes to an increased risk of dementia, but a new study has discovered that the age at which someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has an impact on the risk.

According to a new study, those who get type 2 diabetes at a younger age have a higher chance of dementia. There are numerous reasons why someone with type 2 diabetes is at risk of developing dementia. One reason is that diabetes has a negative impact on the heart. Heart disease and high blood pressure are both linked to strokes, which in turn can contribute to dementia. Other issues include blood sugar regulation, which can result in hypoglycemia, memory loss, and dementia. Insulin resistance in the brain can potentially cause Alzheimer’s disease plaques and tangles.

Scientists from the Université de Paris looked at data from the Whitehall II Study, a long-term health study of British government employees, to see if there was a link between the age of beginning of type 2 diabetes and the risk of dementia.

When they enrolled, the participants were between the ages of 35 and 55.

Researchers looked at blood tests taken every four to five years and 32 years of electronic health records (EHRs) to find people with type 2 diabetes who were taking medication to treat it.

A total of 639 of the 10,308 individuals were later diagnosed with dementia. 153 of the 1,710 people who were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes later developed dementia.

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According to the findings, those diagnosed with diabetes between the ages of 65 and 70 are 24% more likely to develop dementia than people who do not have type 2 diabetes at that age.

The researchers also discovered that persons diagnosed with diabetes between the ages of 60 and 64 were 24% more likely to develop dementia than those diagnosed five years later.

Participants diagnosed with diabetes after the age of 70, on the other hand, did not have an elevated risk of dementia.

Insulin resistance, difficulties with a person’s blood vessels, and frequent variations in blood sugar were all mentioned by the study’s authors in persons with type 2 diabetes. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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